Archives For Lead


Think Twice Before Buying Fidget Spinners from Target


1. Tulane biologist asks: How does lead affect New Orleans’ birds?

Mockingbird

2. ‘Green burials’ are on the rise as baby boomers plan for their future, and funerals

3. Don’t drink the water

Portland’s fluoridation battle shows how tricky it is to integrate science into debates that have as much to do with values as policy.

4. Drought leads to contamination in Duncan’s water supply

Officials in Duncan, Oklahoma, notified residents that the city’s drinking water had violated federal purity standards. City officials say the problem is the result of a prolonged drought that has left city reservoirs several feet below normal.
Photo - Duncan public works director Scott Vaughn talks about the drought and the effect on the city's water quality, Tuesday, September 30, 2014. Photo by David McDaniel

5. California water officials aren’t following own call for conservation

drought honchos - Mike Soubirous

6. NC coal ash spill provokes state regulation, but activists criticize law

While the state’s coal ash management law is unprecedented, environmentalists say it should be stricter

7. U.S. farmers latest to sue Syngenta over GMO corn rejected by China

The logo of Swiss agrochemicals maker Syngenta is seen in front of a cornfield near the company's plant in Stein near Basel September 18, 2012.  REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

8. South Sudan: children bear brunt of man-made disaster

Despite aid agencies’ efforts, the world’s newest nation is on the brink as its leaders fight for the spoils of power

Women carry sacks of maize flour at a food distribution point in Juba, South Sudan

9. Islamic State jihadists are using water as a weapon in Iraq

10. Clean Coal Era Begins

boundary-dam-power-plant

11. Methane emissions soar in drilling boom

Study finds big rise in emissions of methane

Flares like this one at an oil production facility in North Dakota burn off methane that is produced along with oil but is too costly to process and transport.(AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

12. Under Pressure, Texas to Install Air Monitor in Heavily Fracked County

Investigation by ICN and the Center for Public Integrity helped spur Karnes County commissioners to think seriously about fracking’s toxic air emissions.

13. Facing Threat From Pot Farms, West Coast Fisher Proposed For Endangered Species Protection

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fisher as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act. Its populations were first damaged by trapping and logging, and now face a threat from rat poison used by illegal marijuana farms. | credit: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

14. Manure fertilizer increases antibiotic resistance

Faeces from antibiotic-free cows helps resistant bacteria to flourish in soil, puzzling researchers.

15. Study: Extra $22.5B a year in environmental gains for Chesapeake region if cleanup proceeds.

16. U.S. foods labeled ‘natural’ often contain GMOs, group reports

17. BPA Exposure During Pregnancy Linked to Lung Problems in Children

Plastic bottles


1. Warning on bulldozing hills for Chinese cities

China Moving Mountains

2. Where has global warming baked the most in US since 1984? Maine, Vermont, New Mexico, Texas

US hottest spots of warming: Northeast, Southwest

FILE - In this June 27, 2013 file photo, tourists walk close to misters to keep cool as they walk along The Strip during a heat wave in Las Vegas. An Associated Press analysis of federal temperature records shows Nevada's capital city, Carson City, has warmed the most in the...

3. Keystone XL pipeline opponent cites terrorism concerns

Tom Steyer

4. Mercury forms ‘bull’s-eye’ around Alberta oilsands: study

5. Hundreds of scientists to Canada PM: Pipeline report ‘deeply flawed’

Climate change wasn’t mentioned as a factor in the federal review of the Northern Gateway pipeline

6. Canada’s 500,000 Leaky Energy Wells: ‘Threat to Public’

Badly sealed oil and gas wellbores leak emissions barely monitored, experts find.

Wellbore diagram

  7. Lead shot threatens eagles, study says

Eagles in snow

8. Monarch butterfly decline linked to spread of GM crops

Milkweed essential to monarchs in decline because of herbicides used with genetically modified crops

Tyler Flockhart, currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Guelph, led the analysis, which combined all the known data about monarch populations and the factors that influence them.

9. When Food Isn’t Enough: Gut Bugs Affect Malnutrition, Too, Study Finds

Image: A father feeds his child with oral saline at the International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease and Research Bangladesh in Dhaka

10. Health risks of e-cigarettes emerge

Vaping pollutes lungs with toxic chemicals and may even make antibiotic-resistant bacteria harder to kill


1. Stirring up forgotten lead: Smelters across US at risk from tornadoes, floods, quakes

2. Water quality tests data shows elevated lead levels in Toronto homes

Thirteen per cent of household water tests conducted in Toronto over the past six years showed unsafe levels of lead.

Mark Haan and his wife Mariela and 10-year-old son Michael live in an East York home with lead water service. They want to replace the old pipes but cannot afford it.

3. Virus experiments risk unleashing global pandemic, study warns

Benefits of scientific testing in the area are outweighed by risks of pathogenic strains spreading round world, say researchers

Dr. Terrence Tumpey examines specimens of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus in the US

Scientists examine specimens of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus in the US. Photograph: Reuters

4.

Rio 2016 Olympics: Sailors warned over sewage-infested waters, dog carcasses and even ‘human corpses’ in Guanabara Bay

 Five years after Brazil won its Olympic bid, athletes have condemned the site of the Olympic sailing and windsurfing events as a ‘dump’

5. Hungry for a helping of test tube meat? Maybe you should be

Cultured meat

Lab-cultured meat, raised from stem cells, may provide the world with a plentiful, ecologically beneficial and humane source of protein, scientists say. (Krista Simmons / For The Times)

6. Probe finds scant oversight of chemical plants

7. Charismatic Minifauna

Will We Still Have Fruit if Bees Die Off?

Whole Foods Market produce department without items dependent on pollinator populations. (PRNewsFoto/Whole Foods Market)

8. In Utah Boom Town, a Spike in Infant Deaths Raises Questions

5.23_PG0521_UtahBabies

9. I Don’t Want To Be Right

misinformation-580.jpg

10. Tons of drowned livestock pose health threat in flood-hit Balkans; army decontaminates areas

The Associated Press

11. Timely cleanup unlikely at state’s hazardous waste sites

Thousands of waste sites have slim chance of cleanup

12. N.C. panel OKs criminalizing disclosure of chemicals in fracking

Hydraulic Fracturing 091713


1. Better bubbly from … England?

Vineyard-768

2. Scientists flying over Colorado oil boom find worse air pollution

The Front Range is a backdrop for a pump in Weld County.

3. Research shows family environment had big impact on children exposed to lead in Port Pirie

High levels of blood/lead content have been recorded in Port Pirie.

4. U.S. Issues Safety Alert for Oil Trains

5. Is air pollution causing Vernal’s neonatal deaths to rise?

Utah midwife uses obituaries to document troubling trend in birth outcomes in the area.

(Al Hartmann | The Salt Lake Tribune) Midwife Donna Young and her daughter Holt, look at a grave markers of stillborn and newborn children in Rock Point Cemetery in Maeser just north of Vernal. She started noticing a higher than usual amounts of stillborn and newborn deaths in the area the past few years. One corner of the cemetery has several small markers for stillborn and newborn deaths. The TriCounty Health Department is holding a public meeting Wednesday May 7 to investigate the uptick in stillbirths and newborn deaths in the area. Environmentalists believe there’s a connection to air pollution from oil and gas drilling.

6. Vermont’s GMO Bill Expected To Face Major Legal Challenges

7. Elections Not Stopping Obama Pollution Rules

                                    FILE - In this June 24, 2013, file photo, the Capitol Dome is seen behind the Capitol Power Plant in Washington. Democrats running for election in key states are worried about the political fallout from unprecedented greenhouse-gas limits soon to be announced by fellow Democrat Barack Obama's administration. They wish Obama would wait until after November's elections, but if he doesn't start now the rules won't be in place by the time he leaves office. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

8. UPDATE 1-China to close more steel capacity, though still small fraction

9. High CO2 Makes Crops Less Nutritious

Climate change could increase deficiencies in zinc and iron, new study suggests

Sunset on rolling wheat fields in Drummond, Idaho.

10. Philly School District blocks a federal study after health risks are exposed


1, Texas freezes agency’s funding after air pollution data released

2. One man’s obsession with EPA and toxic waste in his neighborhood leads all the way to the Supreme Court

3. U.S. Urged to Tackle Lead in Aviation Gasoline

The global drawdown in the use of leaded fuel has resulted in benefits of some 2.5 trillion dollars a year. Credit: Bigstock

4. Suit alleges shoe boxes contain ingredient in rat repellent

Lawsuit over anti-fungal products

5. Brushing Teeth With Sewer Water Next Step as Texas Faces Drought

6. New map could refocus state’s pollution battles

Ontario recycling center


1. Contaminants have variety of effects on Arctic baby IQs

Feb 07, 2014

Boucher O, G Muckle, JL Jacobson, RC Carter, M Kaplan-Estrin, P Ayotte, É Dewailly, SW Jacobson. 2014. Domain-specific effects of prenatal exposure to PCBs, mercury, and lead on infant cognition: Results from the Environmental Contaminants and Child Development Study in Nunavik. Environmental Health Perspectives. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206323.

Synopsis by EHN Staff
Babies in Arctic Canada are at risk of specific effects on their mental abilities, depending on which contaminants they are exposed to in the womb, according to a new study. While lead, methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls all are linked to neurological effects, each seems to have a different effect on infants. For example, PCBs seemed to impair the babies’ ability to recognize things they have seen.
Marla Cone/EHN
The Inuit are among the most contaminated people on Earth. They eat marine mammals, high on food webs, that are  contaminated by industrial chemicals.

Babies in Arctic Canada are at risk of specific effects on their mental abilities, depending on which contaminants they are exposed to in the womb, according to a new study.

While lead, methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) all are linked to neurological effects, each seems to have a different effect on infants, the scientists concluded. For example, PCBs seemed to impair the babies’ ability to recognize things they have seen.

The study involved 94 Inuit infants and their mothers from Nunavik, in northern Quebec. PCBs, mercury and other pollutants hitchhike north via prevailing winds and currents from industrialized areas, and then accumulate in food webs, predominantly in the eastern Arctic. Because the Inuit in Canada and Greenland eat top predators such as beluga whales and seals, they are among the world’s most contaminated human beings.

The scientists measured the babies’ prenatal exposure to the three contaminants by testing cord blood, and then administered standard mental development tests at 6.5 months and 11 months. The tests involve retrieving toys from under cloth covers, recognizing photographs and performing tasks related to motor skills.

The research was designed to pinpoint the exact damage inflicted on developing brains, which will help experts determine which effects to look for when the children reach school age.

“Each contaminant was independently associated with impairment of distinct aspects of cognitive function with long-term implications for cognitive development – PCBs with visual recognition memory, methylmercury with working memory and an early precursor of executive function, lead with processing speed – deficits that can already be detected during the first year of life,” the authors wrote.

For the research, scientists at Quebec’s Centre de Recherche du CHUQ, who have been studying effects of contaminants on Inuit children for two decades, teamed up with Wayne State University scientists who conducted groundbreaking work in the Great Lakes linking PCBs to reduced IQs in the 1990s.

“This specificity is consistent with our previous findings suggesting that the recognition memory deficit is specific to prenatal PCB exposure and different from effects of other neurotoxicants, including alcohol and cocaine,” the authors wrote.

Similar findings have been reported for children in Michigan, Oswego, N.Y., the Faroe Islands and Taiwan – all areas where many babies are highly exposed to PCBs or mercury from their mothers’ consumption of fish or marine mammals.

“These data provide compelling evidence for the utility of narrow band measures of infant cognition in studies of neurotoxic pollutants,” the researchers wrote.

They added that their findings support efforts in Nunavik to reduce consumption of marine mammals. Pregnant women there are urged to eat Arctic char and other finfish instead.

2. Antibiotics: Too much of a good thing.

3. Salmonella outbreaks expose weaknesses in USDA oversight of chicken parts.

4. Environmental groups denounce arrests of environmentalists near Olympic sites.

5. Fish and Wildlife Service officials repeatedly committed scientific misconduct.

6. Test results for North Carolina’s Dan River.

7. West Virginia Elk River leak sends more students home.

8. US study: Puerto Rico estuary highly contaminated.

9. Egypt’s generals face a watery battle.

10. Record levels of banned insecticide found in Illinois otters.