Archives For Opinons


1. Running Wild: 5 Native Track Teams of Champions

Courtsey of Rod Stanopiewicz
Jordan Lesansee of Albuquerque Academy.

2. DU’s Zach Miller Ready to Take on Notre Dame

AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via AP
In this March 7, 2015, photo, University of Denver’s Zach Miller,
right, takes on Notre Dame’s Garrett Epple during the Pioneers’
11-10 win in Denver. Miller, a Native American who grew up on
the Allegany Indian Reservation in western New York, has helped
to lead Denver to the quarterfinal round of the NCAA Tournament
against Ohio State Saturday in Denver.

3. How One U.S. President Became a Native Advocate

Associated Press
President Richard Nixon

4. Domination and Diversity: Galileo’s Lesson for Canada

5. In Response to War of the Words: ICWA Hearings Reignite Ancient Battle Over Indian Children

6. How Far Can a Dandelion Seed Fly? Ask a Native American

7. SMH @Adam Sandler #Wake Up and Smell the Refreshing Aroma of Equality!

8. Oglala Sioux Water Supply Director Honored with John W. Keys III Award

Courtesy Bureau of Reclamation
Focused on high quality drinking water, Frank Means receives the
John W. Keys III Award. Pictured, from left, are: David Rosenkrance
)Bureau of Reclamation Dakotas Area Office Manager, John Yellowbird
Steele (President Oglala Sioux Tribe), Means (Director of the Oglala
Sioux Rural Water Supply System), Bud Stiles (Bureau of Reclamation retired).

9. Trafficking in Native Communities

iStock
A review of community impact data taken from four formal studies
demonstrates the disproportionate impact the commercial sex trade
has on indigenous communities in both the United States and Canada.

10. Four States Sue U.S. Interior Over ‘Too Strict’ Fracking Regulations

Thinkstock
A fracking well.
Grand Council 1898 Haudenosaunee Confederacy
kahnawakelonghouse.com
Six Nations Confederacy Council at Grand River 1898.
NAJA 2014 Student Project
NAJA/indiegogo
NAJA is crowdfunding to encourage student journalists to cover the 2016
presidential race.

1. 100-Year-Old Baskets Stolen From Health Services Building

Photos provided by UIHS
The traditional baskets stolen from UIHS Potawot Health Village in Arcata, CA.

2. Attention Muppet Lovers: The Jim Henson Company Wants Native Puppeteers!

AP Images
Jim Henson, creator of the Muppet Show, poses in September 1977 with some of the
characters he personally operates. In the back row are, left to right, Dr. Teeth and the
Swedish Chef. In the front row are, left to right, Rowlf the Dog, Kermit the Frog and
Mr. Waldorf. (AP Photo)

3. Driving While Indian: A Refresher Course

4. USET’s Semi-Annual Meeting Begins; Honors Two Veterans

Courtesy United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc.
From left: Rodney Butler, Mashantucket Pequot tribal council chairman; Randy Noka,
Narragansett Indian Tribe council member; and USET vice president, and USET
President Brian Patterson

5. Miller Helps Denver Advance to NCAA Lax Semis; Lyle Thompson Makes History in Final Game

University of Denver
Zach Miller is an attackman for the University of Denver Pioneers.

6. Democratic congresswoman apologizes for ethnically loaded gesture

7. Native American student told not to display eagle feather at graduation

8. Rep. Caught On Video Making Racist ‘Native American’ Whooping Noise

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9. https://youtu.be/3E_cM0isL1E

10. https://youtu.be/3oIWKXE6kLU


1. Ishmael Bermudez: Miami resident of Native American heritage will not sell his tiny plot for $1.8m because he believes it is sacred ground

2. Native American health center launches $4M expansion

Britta Guerrero is CEO of the Sacramento Native American Health Center.

3. Native News Update May 15, 2015

4. Rebel Music | Native America: 7th Generation Rises (Full Episode) | MTV

5. Brad Pitt’s Promise of Free Homes on Fort Peck Underway, But With a Cost

Caption: Four of the 5 designs for sustainable housing for the Fort Peck reservation, presented by Make It Right Foundation last year.

6. Native American actors walk off Adam Sandler movie set

7. Gallery: Native American youth perform in Charlotte

CMS partnered with Native Americans to provide a free family event to highlight their heritage.

Payne Sheek, 17, a Lumbee Indian, performed a men's fancy dance before a gathering of at least a couple dozen people Saturday. Sheek and six other Native American youth with The Guilford Native American Association came to Charlotte to spread their culture. "It's important for our children to grow up with a sense of self-identity," said Nora Dial-Stanley, 50, who lead the group. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools partnered with the Metrolina Native American Association to provide a free family event to highlight and honor Native American heritage at the Smith Family Center. The event was open to the public and showcased traditional dancers, story tellers, a flutist and cultural displays unique to Native Americans on Saturday, May 16, 2015.

8. Robbie Robertson Music For The Native Americans Live

9. Making a Native American Earth bowl

10. You Can Do Anything With Bayonets

11. Making staghorn sumac bread

12. Survival way to purifying water from the creek


By Felina Silver Robinson

Growing up in the shadow of our ancestors where they and those before them were so set in their ways didn’t allow for much room for patience and understanding. Children were raised with ignorance towards understanding and dealing with their feelings.  No one wanted to take the time to help their children work through the emotions they were struggling to hold on to. Each day children questioned who they were and couldn’t understand why they were experiencing those feelings.  Parents were not raised to deal with feelings, in fact it was once considered to be shameful or embarrassing to do so. A Woman couldn’t even raise a child out-of-wedlock and keep the child nor did families deal with mental health issues.

Looking back through time there were signs of women and men enjoying same-sex relationships. In some cases it almost seemed like it was a sport to see how many men and how many women could be intimate with one another at the same time. Somehow this was not shunned at that time. At times it was like watching a boxing match or an old black and white movie.  This is true going all the way back to the time of Sappho.  Anyone who has read Greek mythology can tell you that relationships in general didn’t really conceive of sexual orientation to identify with who an individual is as we now do in modern times. While most men married woman 20 years their junior and had relations with men similarly aged. It was just what happened.  This makes one wonder how behavior could be so acceptable at one point and become so socially unacceptable during more modern times.

Most people try to raise their children to believe in themselves for the person that they are and tell them that they have to follow their dreams, whatever they may be. We all know that no society or other person should decide who and what any person chooses to be. Each individual lives their lives within their own body. The skin that covers them is their own. The eyes they see themselves with are their own. When they look in the mirror, they may not always be happy with what they see, but it shouldn’t be because they feel trapped inside their body as someone they feel they were never meant to be. You, nor I can decide that for another person and we should never think that it is right for us to do so.

The Story of Bruce Jenner is a sad one. I’m just proud that he found the strength within himself at age 65 to make the choice that’s right for him. I only wish that he had been able to live a fuller life as the person he had truly wanted to be.  I’ve enjoyed seeing him evolve through the years. I idolized his athletic stamina back in the day and was proud of him when he walked into the Kardashian family and loved them all for who they were and they in turn were able to do the same for him.

I look forward to seeing what female name that Bruce will choose to take on. It’s only now known that it will start with the letter “K”.  I hope that his strength will motivate and allow everyone else that struggles from within to find their true self to feel empowered enough to follow their own dreams to a path of happiness. As best said by a beautiful Doris Day: “Que Sera, Sera.”

 


1. Life Is Worth Living: Walking to Prevent Suicide During Native Heritage Month

Rayna Madero/Facebook
Rayna Madero is challenging everyone to walk one mile a day for suicide prevention throughout the entire month of November.

2. Mr. McConaughey, You’re All Wrong, All Wrong, All Wrong About the Redskins

AP Photo/ Evan Vucci
Actor Matthew McConaughey, right, stands with Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder during NFL football practice at Redskins Park, on Wednesday, June 4, 2014, in Ashburn, Va. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

3. EPA Grants to Drought-Stricken Southwest Tribes Total $43 Million

Rich Pedroncelli/AP
The dried-out bed of Lake Mendocino, California, in February 2014. The state is gripped in its worst drought in recorded history.

4. Skwachàys Lodge Combines Native Culture and Social Good

Hans Tammemagi
Skwachàys Lodge is an Aboriginal-art hotel and represents a unique milestone for indigenous people. It is located in Vancouver, Canada.

5. Two Weeks to Go and Races Come Down to Turnout in SD, Alaska and Wisc.

6. There’s a War Going On! Janet Rogers Writes Dispatches From the Front Lines

Talonbooks
‘The white and purple image on the cover reflects the Iroquoian use of wampum, day and night, peace and war, life and death, and Janet carries the wampum and the message.’

7. Don’t Panic About Ebola, IHS Says: Get Your Flu Shot

U.S. Centers for Disease Control
Portion of CDC flier urging American Indians to get vaccinated from the flu, a much bigger danger than the Ebola virus.

8. Evidentiary Hearing Scheduled November 10 in Fairbanks Four Case

Courtesy April Monroe Frick/Free the Fairbanks Four

9. NIGA-Blue Stone Create First Guide to Tribal Economic Development

Blue Stone Strategy Group Chairman Jamie Fullmer at the United Tribal Leaders Summit, North Dakota, September 2014
10. Why the US Should Put Native Tribal Sovereignty in a New Constitution