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Russia failed to tell FBI about Islamic jihad call, report says

WASHINGTON — The Russian government declined to provide the F.B.I. with information about Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev two years before the attack that might have prompted more extensive scrutiny of him, the New York Times reported Wednesday.

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The information is contained in an inspector general’s review of how American intelligence and law enforcement agencies could have thwarted the bombing.

Russian officials had told the F.B.I. in 2011 that Tamerlan Tsarnaev, “was a follower of radical Islam and a strong believer,” the New York Times reported, and that Tsarnaev had changed drastically since 2010 as he prepared to leave the United States for travel to Russia.

But after an initial investigation by F.B.I. agents in Boston, the Russians declined several bureau requests for additional information they had about him, the newspaper reported.

The report found that it was only after the bombing occurred last April that the Russians shared with the F.B.I. the additional intelligence, including information from a telephone conversation the Russian authorities had intercepted between Tsarnaev and his mother in which they discussed Islamic jihad.


FBI debated release of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev photos at finish line

Suspect 2 is highlighted

BOSTON — FBI officials say they debated whether to release photos that led to the capture of a suspect in last year’s bombing at the Boston Marathon that killed three people and injured hundreds of others.

Stephanie Douglas, executive assistant director of the FBI’s National Security Division, said in a “60 Minutes” interview aired Sunday that releasing images of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev  was the right thing to do even though an MIT police officer was killed soon after.

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Prosecutors say Tsarnaev and his brother, Tamerlan, killed officer Sean Collier while on the run.

Douglas says law enforcement “really had no choice” but to release the photos.

She says an argument against releasing the security camera images was that they could have provided an incentive for the still unidentified suspects to escape.

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Biggest threat to US is homegrown terrorists, Keating says

BOSTON — U.S. Rep. William Keating says a congressional committee’s investigation into the Boston Marathon bombings has reinforced that the biggest threat to the U.S. is the radicalization of homegrown terrorists.

The Massachusetts Democrat spoke by phone Monday from Moscow, where he and House Homeland Security Committee Chairman U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, are looking into the marathon bombings and reviewing security procedures in Sochi ahead of the Olympics.

Keating says the committee is close to finishing its report on the April 15 bombings near the marathon finish line that killed three people and injured more than 260 others. It should be released early in February.

He says it appears dead bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev met with insurgents in Russia but didn’t pass their vetting process and instead returned to the U.S.


Published on Dec 31, 2013

http://www.democracynow.org - Egypt is facing a major escalation of a crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood and other critical voices. The military government has designated the Brotherhood a “terrorist organization” after a suicide bombing last week that killed 14 people. The announcement came even though the Brotherhood condemned the attack and an unrelated jihadist group claimed responsibility. Using the “terrorism” label, the Egyptian regime has arrested hundreds of Brotherhood members and seized their assets. It is the latest in a crackdown that began with the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi in July following mass protests against his rule. The crackdown has also spread to opposition activists and journalists. Two leading figures behind the 2011 uprising, Alaa Abd El-Fattah and Ahmed Maher, remain behind bars following their arrests for opposing a new anti-protest law. El-Fattah is awaiting trial while Maher and two others have been sentenced to three years in prison. Meanwhile, four journalists with the news network Al Jazeera — correspondent Peter Greste, producers Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, and cameraman Mohamed Fawzy — were been arrested in Cairo on accusations of “spreading false news” and holding meetings with the Muslim Brotherhood. Only Fawzy has been released so far. Egypt’s military government has repeatedly targeted Al Jazeera, raiding offices, ordering an affiliate’s closure and deporting several staffers. The arrests come as a new report details the dangerous conditions for journalists in Egypt and other troubled areas around the world. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, conditions in Egypt “deteriorated dramatically” in 2013, with six reporters killed, more than in any previous year. Egypt trailed only Iraq, where 10 journalists were killed, and Syria, where at least 29 journalists were killed. Overall, the Middle East accounted for two-thirds of at least 70 reporters’ deaths worldwide. We are joined by two guests: Sherif Mansour, the Middle East and North Africa program coordinator at the Committee to Protect Journalists; and Sharif Abdel Kouddous, Democracy Now! correspondent, and a fellow at The Nation Institute.


 

http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/53946386/#53946386


Kavkazcenter.com via AFP – Getty Images, file

Russia’s top Islamist leader Doku Umarov, left, in an undated video posted on July 3, 2013.

By Tracy Connor, Staff Writer, NBC News

trio of deadly bombings in Volgograd ahead of the Winter Olympics has focused new attention on notorious Chechen warlord Doku Umarov, who has claimed responsibility for a wave of similar terrorist attacks in the name of Islam and vowed to stop the Sochi Games.

In a video statement this summer, the self-proclaimed emir of Caucasus declared that holding the global sports spectacular in the Black Sea resort amounted to “demonic dances on the bones of our ancestors” and said his band of rebels would “use all means” to derail the event.

A security clampdown at Sochi makes a major assault at the actual Olympic Games unlikely, some analysts say, but Volgograd — some 600 miles northeast of Sochi — is the biggest city in the region and a transit hub. Two of this week’s bombings have targeted public transportation, which may give travelers from across Russia and around the world the jitters.

“The most likely suspect is either Umarov or some group connected to him,” said David Satter, a Russian scholar at the Hudson Institute. “It’s all very worrisome.”

No one has taken credit for the Volgograd carnage, and it’s not clear how much direct control Umarov, who is about 49, exercises over the loosely knit coalition of autonomous Islamist groups in the so-called Caucasus Emirate that could be to blame.

But experts say the cabals under his umbrella share a common goal — global jihad — and he has become the camera-ready face of that ideology in the region.

His early history is murky — he claims his parents were part of the Chechen intelligentsia and there are reports he got an engineering degree or did prison time — but he joined the insurgency against the Russian Federation in 1994 and fought in the second war that began in 1999.

He rose through the ranks of the Chechen independence movement until he split off from some of his old political allies in 2007 and announced a new religion-based mission: to unite Northern Caucasus into a single Islamic state ruled by Sharia law.

“Today in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Palestine, our brothers are fighting,” he said at the time. “Everyone who attacked Muslims wherever they are are our enemies, common enemies. Our enemy is not Russia only, but everyone who wages war against Islam and Muslims.”

Sergei Karpov / Reuters

Flowers placed at the site of an explosion on a trolleybus in Volgograd.

Although he had rejected terrorism in a 2005 interview, in his new role he soon embraced sabotage and attacks on civilians, arguing it was justified by the government’s brutal crackdown on separatists.

In August 2009, a group linked to him claimed it had bombed the Sayno-Shushenskata hydro-electric plant in Siberia, killing more than two dozen people, though the government later insisted it was an accident.

Three months later, Umarov’s separatists said they had orchestrated a blast that derailed the high-speed Nevsky Express train between Moscow and Saint Petersburg, killing 27 people.

That was followed by the March 2010 suicide bombings of the Moscow subway, which killed 39 people. Umarov said it was retribution for the death of four garlic-picking villagers at the hands of security forces.

His message to Russians at the time: “I promise you that war will come to your streets and you will feel it in your lives, feel it on your own skin.”

Umarov also claimed he ordered the suicide bombing at Moscow’s Domodedovo International Airport, which killed 36 people in February 2011.

“More special operations will be carried out in the future,” he said in a video posted on the Internet.

“Among us there are hundreds of brothers who are prepared to sacrifice themselves. … We can at any time carry out operations where we want.”

The father of six — who retired as emir in 2010 only to change his mind days later — was even allegedly behind a plot to kill Russian President Vladimir Putin that was reportedly foiled in 2012.

Andrew Kutchins, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said Umarov has not been definitively tied to some of the attacks and “sometimes he may be talking more game than he has.”

“He hasn’t been able to establish the authority over a network as successfully as someone like Osama bin Laden,” Kutchins said.
“He’s kind of a publicity hound for sure. Just how operationally effective he has been is impossible to say.”

Several times, Russian and Chechen officials have claimed Umarov was dead. But despite taking a bullet to the jaw and stepping on a landmine, he survived to to make his most audacious threat in July — that he would stop the Sochi Games.

“Sochi has been under virtual lockdown and to penetrate that is going to be very, very difficult,” Kutchins said. “But to create a sense of terror in Russia and outside Russia about the Games could very well likely be the goal.

“We may be seeing the beginning of a series of terrorist attacks to terrorize the country — to lead some delegations to think about not attending the Games, to cast a dark shadow over Vladimir Putin’s leadership and his claims he has brought security and stability to Russia.”

Related

Rush-hour blast kills 14 in Volgograd, Russia; 3rd deadly attack in four days


http://youtu.be/ZW097MZqhao

 

Published on Dec 26, 2013

 

In a videotaped plea to the president, secretary of state, the media and his family, U.S. government contractor Warren Weinstein is seen urging the Obama administration to negotiate for his release. He says he feels “totally abandoned and forgotten,” and calls on all Americans to use social media to mount a campaign to seek his release. Weinstein, 72, of Rockville, was kidnapped by al-Qaeda militants in Pakistan in 2011. The video was provided to The Washington Post in an anonymous email on Dec. 25. The Obama administration has said it will not negotiate with al-Qaeda for Weinstein’s release.

 

 


Lockerbie bombing probe still an open case, Robert Mueller says

At the U.S. Justice Department, Robert Mueller, then a young prosecutor, was tasked with leading the investigation. Now, 25 years later, Mueller says the hunt for the bombers goes on. CBS News justice correspondent Bob Orr speaks to the former FBI chief, who says the case still haunts him.


Classified documents ‘contain vital’ information

Boston MA — U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch is calling for the release of additional documents related to the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.

The Massachusetts Democrat has teamed with North Carolina Republican Rep. Walter Jones to file a resolution urging the Obama administration to declassify 28 pages of a joint investigation by the House and Senate intelligence committees.

Looking back: Boston on Sept. 11, 2001

The 28 pages have remained classified since the findings were released in 2002.

Lynch said in a statement that he recently had the opportunity to review the classified section and believes the information should be made public.

Lynch said the 28 pages “contain information that is vital to a full understanding of the events and circumstances surrounding this tragedy” and that the family of the victims and the American people deserve a full accounting of the events.

Read more: http://www.wcvb.com/news/politics/us-rep-lynch-calls-for-release-of-sept-11-information/-/9848766/23277120/-/ddcnef/-/index.html#ixzz2mV79GjHG

 

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