Archives For Ships


USS Vandergrift contacted the sailboat around 4 p.m. Saturday 900 miles from land

A family stranded in the middle of the ocean has boarded a Navy frigate tasked with saving them and a sick baby. NBC 7′s Diana Guevara has the latest updates.

Watch Report: Watching Diana7a0406

A San Diego family and their seriously ill baby, who were stuck on a sailboat  hundreds of miles off the Mexico coast, have boarded a Navy rescue ship Sunday morning, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

USS Vandegrift arrived near the sailboat at 1 a.m. and waited until first light to rescue the family.

Around 8 a.m., sailors used an inflatable boat to bring the infant, family and four California Air National Guard pararescumen aboard the Vandergrift.

Two weeks ago, Eric and Charlotte Kaufman, along with their 1-year-old and 3-year-old daughters, set sail on an around-the-world journey.

But Thursday, they set out a satellite distress call, saying the youngest girl had become violently sick. On top of that, their boat had lost its steering and communication abilities.

In a large coordinated effort, the California Air National Guard’s 129th Rescue Wing worked with the Navy to send four pararescuemen, who jumped from a plane into the ocean and climbed aboard the Rebel Heart to treat the girl.

By Saturday, they said the baby’s condition had stabilized while they waited for further transportation from the Vandergrift.

According to a Facebook post from Charlotte’s sister, Sariah English, the Navy frigate made contact with the family just after 4 p.m. Saturday.

USS Vandergrift stayed about five miles from the boat through Saturday night as its crew planned how to get the family off the boat.

“The bottom line is the safety and security of not only the family members that are on board, but also of all the personnel that are involved to save the infant. That is paramount,” said 2nd Lt. Roderick Bersamina with the 129th Rescue Wing.

The family reportedly was given one trip to get their things off the boat – as much as they can carry — before they left it behind in the ocean.

They did not sink the Rebel Heart; instead, they tagged it and let it float along.

The Kaufmans should return to San Diego on Monday, English said. They requested to stay at a Navy base hotel and then travel to New Mexico, where English lives.

Because the family will have to abandon most of their possessions, English is working with friends in San Diego to collect donations to give the Kaufmans when they arrive.

It’s unclear what caused the baby to fall ill. English told NBC 7 that she had diarrhea, fevers, and a large rash and had been vomiting.

In a post on her blog, Charlotte had said on March 11 that both she and her 1-year-old daughter had tested positive for salmonella.

Officials have not announced where they are taking the baby to be treated.


Richard Phillips captured by pirates in 2009

BOURNE, Mass. — Richard Phillips, whose real-life ordeal as a hostage of Somali pirates was the subject of the movie “Captain Phillips,” has been selected to address graduates at Massachusetts Maritime Academy’s commencement.

Phillips, a graduate of the college, will also receive an honorary degree at the June 21 ceremony.

Phillips was captain of the commercial vessel Maersk Alabama when it was captured by pirates in 2009. He was held in a lifeboat for several days before Navy SEAL snipers killed three pirates.

School president Rear Adm. Richard Gurnon also invited actor Tom Hanks — who portrayed Phillips in the movie — to graduation, but due to scheduling conflicts he couldn’t make it.

Gurnon tells the Cape Cod Times that Phillips has a “quiet confidence” and “genuine appeal to young people.”


1. Convulsing sea lions along coast may hold clues to epilepsy

Sea lion Blarney McCresty recuperates at the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito. Photo: Lacy Atkins, The Chronicle

2. Ship Channel could open to some traffic today

Ecological toll: Sludge from damaged barge spreads in Galveston Bay at ‘worst time’ for birds

An oiled Laughing Gulls shown left sits next to one without oil at the Bolivar Flats Shorebird Sanctuary Monday, March 24, 2014 in Bolivar. Officials with the Houston Audubon Society said the oiled bird would mostly likely not survive. It cannot be captured and by the time it is weak enough to be caught it is too late.  (Melissa Phillip / Houston Chronicle) Photo: Melissa Phillip, Houston Chronicle

3. America Needs a Bunker to Store Its Mountain of Toxic TVs

Image: Basel Action Network

4. Extreme horticulture greens the city

Central Park Development

5. Beneath cities, a decaying tangle of gas pipes.

It is a danger hidden beneath the streets of New York City, unseen and rarely noticed: 6,302 miles of pipes transporting natural gas. Leaks, like the one that is believed to have led to the explosion that killed eight people in East Harlem this month, number in the thousands every year

6. Homes near rail lines face exposure to harmful emissions: study

 University of Washington study sparks renewed calls for health study for Surrey coal project
Homes near rail lines face exposure to harmful emissions: study

7. We Are All Mutants

On the hunt for disease genes, researchers uncover humanity’s 
vast diversity

We 
Are 
All 
Mutants 1

8. Scientists Condemn New FDA Study Saying BPA Is Safe: “It Borders on Scientific Misconduct”

Researchers working on a joint NIH-FDA program to better regulate harmful chemicals accuse the agency of undermining their research with a flawed and deceptive study.

9. Big climate report: Warming is big risk for people

10. Endangered desert species cling to existence

Facing drought and climate change, animals such as the Amargosa vole are struggling to survive in the Mojave Desert.


Watch the video here – http://www.wcvb.com/time-lapse-raising-the-costa-concordia/-/9849586/21975552/-/14kxf05/-/index.html#.UjiRUBA6t3s.twitter

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