Archives For Religion


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Andromache”,  in Greek myth, the daughter of Eëtion (prince of Thee in Mysia) and wife of HECTOR. All her relations perished in or shortly after the taking of Troy. When the captives were allotted, Andromache fell to  NEOPTOLEMUS, the son of ACHILLES, whom she accompanied to Epirus and to whom she bore three sons. At Neoptolemus’ death, HELENUS, the brother of Hector, inherited both Andromache and the kingdom. After the death of Helenus, Andromache returned to Asia Minor with her youngest son, Pergamus, who there founded a town named after himself.

Andromache in Captivity by Frederic Leighton (ca. 1886)

(Comeback on 10/23/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Andromeda”.

#ReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Androgyny”,  in mythology, the state of having the characteristics of both male and female. Androgyny, as the union of male and female can represent totality, completeness, or perfection; hence in some mythical traditions, a primal mythic being (i.e. a creator or first human) is androgynous and thereby expresses in his or her person a union of disparate features or opposites. This does not express a chaotic hybrid but rather a creative totality (the “coincidence of opposites”). In other systems human procreation is explained in terms of a division of a complete, originally androgynous being (as in Plato’s Symposium and in the Gnostic Gospel of Philip).

Cleavage of the primordial androgyny, Greek vase, 2400 BC The Torah and the Midrash

(Comeback on 10/22/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Andromache”.

#Today’sReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Saint Andrews”,  (d. traditionally 60/70 CE, Patras, Achaia [Greece]; feast day November 30), one of the Twelve APOSTLES and brother of St. PETER. He is the patron saint of Scotland and of Russia.

In the SYNOPTIC GOSPELS (Matthew, Mark and Luke), Peter and Andrew were called from their fishing b Jesus to follow him, promising that he would make them fishers of men. In John’s Gospel he is the first apostle name, and he was a disciple of ST. JOHN THE BAPTISTS before Jesus’ call.

Early Byzantine tradition (dependent on John 1:40) calls Andrew protokletos, “first called.” Legends recount his missionary activity in the area about the Black Sea. Apocryphal writings centered on him include the Acts of Andrew, Acts of Andrew and Matthias, and Acts of Peter and Andrew. A 4th-century account reports his death by CRUCIFIXION, and late medieval accretions describe the cross as X-shaped. He is incon-graphically represented with an X-shaped cross.

ST. JEROME records that Andrew’s relics were taken from Patras (modern Pátrai) to Constantinople (modern Istanbul) by command of the Roman emperor Constantius II in 357. From there the body was taken to Amalfi, Italy (Church of Sant’ Andrea), in 1208, and in the 15th century the head was taken to Rome (St. Peter’s, Vatican City). In September 1964 Pope Paul VI returned Andrew’s head to Pátrai as a gesture of goodwill toward the Christians of Greece.

(Comeback on 10/21/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Androgyny”.

#Today’sReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Andania Mysteries”,  ancient Greek mystery cult, held in honor of the goddess DEMETER and her daughter Kore (PERSEPHONE) at the town of Andania in Messenia. An inscription of 92 BCE gives directions for the conduct of the rites, although it relates no details of the initiation ceremonies. The ritual was performed by certain “holy ones” of both sexes, who were chosen from the various tribes.

Initiation seems to have been open to men, women, and children, bonded and free, and all costumes were to be severely plain and inexpensive material. An excetion was made for those who were to be “costumed into the likeness of deities,” possibly indicating that a pageant or drama was performed. There was a procession, precedence in which was strictly regulated, and the main ceremonial was preceded by sacrifices to a number of deities.

Demeter drives her horse-drawn chariot containing her daughter Persephone at Selinunte, Sicily 6th century BC.

(Comeback on 10/20/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Saint Andrew”.

#Today’sReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Anchises”,  in Greek mythology, member of the royal family of Troy; he was king of DARDANUS on Mount Ida. The goddess APHRODITE met him and bore him AENEAS. For revealing the name of the child’s mother, Anchises was killed or struck blind by lightning. In later legend and in Virgil’s Aeneid, he was conveyed out of Troy on the shoulders of his son Aeneas.

Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598.

(Comeback on 10/19/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Andania Mysteries”.

#Today’sReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Ancestor Worship”,  any of a variety of religious beliefs and practices concerned with the spirits of dead persons regarded as relatives, some of whom may be mythical.

The core of ancestor worship is the belief in the continuing existence of the dead and in a close relation between the living and the dead, who continue to influence the affairs of the living. The spirits of the dead are often thought to help the living, but they often are thought to harm if not propitiated. Veneration is shown those  persons who in their lifetimes held positions of importance, such as heads of families, lineages, clans, tribes, kingdoms, and other social groups. In some societies only the spirits of the recently deceased are given attention; in others, all ancestors, near and remote in time, are included. In still other societies, on ancestor may be the focus of attention, and he or she is often regarded as a hero. In most societies, ancestor worship was only one element of a complex of SUPERNATURALISM and seldom a dominant feature.

The presence or absence of ancestor worship relates in a general way to the importance of KINSHIP in the societies concerned. Where continuity of kinship ad inheritance of property are very important, elders are characteristically regarded with respect, and the persistence of bonds of affinity with ancestors is favored. In modern China and Japan, where the importance of kinship and the size of kin groups have declined, traditional practices of ancestor worship have correspondingly declined.

All of the behavior and practices that are customary with regards to other kinds of supernatural beings are found in rites of ancestral worship—veneration and propitiation in the forms of prayers, offerings, sacrifices, the maintenance of moral standards, and festivals of honor that may include pageantry, music, dance, and other forms of art. Perhaps the only truly distinctive ritual acts of ancestor worship are commemorative ceremonies, held annually or at other fixed intervals, and tendance of graves, monuments, or other symbols commemorating them. Acts of piety toward ancestors reflect the idea that the spirits continue in some measure to be kin and are active participants in the life of the community. Whether ancestral spirits are themselves gods with powers or are intermediaries with higher powers, communion with them is a form of transcendence of ordinary states of existence, which may be a conscious or unconscious goal of the acts of devotion.

Ancestor worship in various forms was practiced amount the ancient civilization of the Mediterranean, where cults of the dead sometimes also existed, and among later European peoples. Ancient EGYPTIAN RELIGION featured a cult of the dead but gave little attention to ancestral spirits except to those of royalty, which were venerated by the people and especially honored in rites observed by their royal descendants. In ancient GREEK RELIGION, ancestor worship overlapped with hero worship. Some ritual attention was given to spirits of household heads and political leaders, and the spirits of men whose deeds were heroic were sometimes elevated to immortality and made the objects of rites of reverence. Ancient celts, Teutons, Vikings, and Slavic groups also conducted rites o propitiation and sacrifice.

Among nonliterate societies, well-developed ancestor cults are limited principally to peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, and some tribal groups of India and adjacent parts of Asia. The greatest development was in AFRICAN RELIGIONS, where ancestral spirits are commonly an important part of the roster of supernatural beings. Among the civilizations of Asia, the classic examples of ancestor worship have been China and Japan. In both societies, however, reverence for, rather than worship of, ancestors in a more nearly accurate description of the beliefs and practices. The spread of modern European culture weakened, displaced, or otherwise put an end to ancestor worship as an overt practice in most nonliterate societies, and technological, social and ideological changes discouraged its continuation in more modern societies. Yet its remnants continue to be periodically significant in a number of Latin American, African, and Asian cultures.

The 19th-century sociologist Herbert Spencer regarded fear and consequent propitiation of the souls of ancestors as the earliest form of religion, an interpretation that later scholars set aside as unverifiable. Modern scholarship has followed the trend of the social sciences in considering ancestor cults in relation to other elements of religious complexes, the social order, and the whole of culture. Through their symbolic representations of kinship and the social hierarchy of kin groups, the beliefs and acts of ancestor worship may be seen as establishing and reinforcing ideas of social roles and identities, thereby contributing to psychological well-being and social harmony. But ideas about ancestors may also be seen sometimes to instill as well as to allay anxiety. In this connection ancestor worship may have an important moral significance by encouraging social conformity.

(Comeback on 10/18/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Anchises”.

#Today’sReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

”Ancaeus”,  in Greek mythology, the son of ZEUS or POSEIDON and king of the Leleges of Samons. In the Argonautic expedition, after the death of Tiphys, the helmsman of the Argo, Ancaeus took his place. While planting a vineyard, Ancaeus was told by a seer that he would never drink of its wine. When the grapes were ripe, he squeezed the juice into a cup and, raising it to his lips, mocked the seer, who retorted with the words “There is many a slip between cup and the lip.” At that moment it was announced that a wild boar was ravaging the land. Ancaeus set down the cup, leaving the wine untasted, hurried out, and was killed by the boar.

(Comeback on 10/17/14 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Ancestor Worship”.

#Today’sReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver