Archives For Readings


Reservation Blues

by Sherman Alexie

Side note from Felina Silver Robinson: This book is one native man’s view of just what life was like on the reservation. Sherman Alexie is a strong, talented writer who can make you feel the pain and sorrow of all that he writes about. I have nothing but respect for his great writings. There are some people out there that feel that Sherman Alexie has exaggerated reservation life. I will say that although native blood runs through my veins, I’ve never lived upon or stepped foot upon reservation land. Therefore, I leave all the writing about that life to those who have been there and lived it.  Each man’s view of their experience is just that, their own, this is Sherman Alexie view. This story is about one man who sold his soul to the devil so his blues music would be the best out there. He didn’t know the price he would pay. He travels looking for the best medicine woman to help him solve his problem in this process you will see just what Sherman Alexie views to be life on a reservation. Read this amazing story about one man’s view of Native reservation life.

More About The Writer: Sherman Alexie

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Valanced (adj.)

Valanced means fringed with a beard.  Valanced is cited in William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet (Ham II.ii.422). Hamlet says to one of the players: “Thy face is valanced since I saw thee last.”

The players arrive, heralded by Polonius, who Hamlet calls a big baby. Hamlet fakes madness for Polonius’s benefit.

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Sorrow-wreathen (adj.)

Sorrow-wreathen means deformed, disfigured, ugly.  Sorrow-wreathen is cited in William Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors (CE IV.ii.22) Adriana says to Luciana about Antipholus about Syracuse: “Stigmatical in making, worse in mind..” 

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Strappado (n.)

Strappado means type of torturing instrument.  Strappado is cited in William Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 1 (1H4 II.iv.233) Falstaff says to everyone: “an I were at the strappado…I would not tell you on compulsion.”

Henry the Fourth Part 1 Act 2 Scene 4

Henry the Fourth Part 1 Act 2 Scene 4

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Still-discordant (adj.)

Still-discordant means always disagreeing, perpetually quarrelling.  Still-discordant is cited in William Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 2 (2H4 Induction 19) Rumour alone says: The still-discordant wavering multitude.” 

Henry IV Part 2 – Prologue – Rumour

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Stigmatical (adj.)

Stigmatical means deformed, disfigured, ugly.  Stigmatical is cited in William Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors (CE IV.ii.22) Adriana says to Luciana about Antipholus about Syracuse: “Stigmatical in making, worse in mind..” Felina Silver Robinson

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Scrimer (n.)

Scrimer means fencer, swordsman.  Scrimer is cited in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet (Ham IV.vii.99) Claudius says to Laertes, about the French: “The scrimers of their nation.” 

I’ve decided to split Act IV Scene 7 into two sequences: Claudius’ Seduction (of Laertes) and Ophelia’s Death.

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