Archives For Readings


Valanced (adj.)

Valanced means fringed with a beard.  Valanced is cited in William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet (Ham II.ii.422). Hamlet says to one of the players: “Thy face is valanced since I saw thee last.”

The players arrive, heralded by Polonius, who Hamlet calls a big baby. Hamlet fakes madness for Polonius’s benefit.

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver


Sorrow-wreathen (adj.)

Sorrow-wreathen means deformed, disfigured, ugly.  Sorrow-wreathen is cited in William Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors (CE IV.ii.22) Adriana says to Luciana about Antipholus about Syracuse: “Stigmatical in making, worse in mind..” 

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #FelinaSilverRobinson, #Sorrow-wreathen


Strappado (n.)

Strappado means type of torturing instrument.  Strappado is cited in William Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 1 (1H4 II.iv.233) Falstaff says to everyone: “an I were at the strappado…I would not tell you on compulsion.”

Henry the Fourth Part 1 Act 2 Scene 4

Henry the Fourth Part 1 Act 2 Scene 4

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #FelinaSilverRobinson, #Strappado


Still-discordant (adj.)

Still-discordant means always disagreeing, perpetually quarrelling.  Still-discordant is cited in William Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 2 (2H4 Induction 19) Rumour alone says: The still-discordant wavering multitude.” 

Henry IV Part 2 – Prologue – Rumour

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #FelinaSilverRobinson, #Still-discordant


Stigmatical (adj.)

Stigmatical means deformed, disfigured, ugly.  Stigmatical is cited in William Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors (CE IV.ii.22) Adriana says to Luciana about Antipholus about Syracuse: “Stigmatical in making, worse in mind..” Felina Silver Robinson

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #FelinaSilverRobinson, #Strigmatical


Scrimer (n.)

Scrimer means fencer, swordsman.  Scrimer is cited in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet (Ham IV.vii.99) Claudius says to Laertes, about the French: “The scrimers of their nation.” 

I’ve decided to split Act IV Scene 7 into two sequences: Claudius’ Seduction (of Laertes) and Ophelia’s Death.

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #FelinaSilverRobinson, #Scrimer


Sherris-Sack (n.)

Sherris-Sack means white wine from Xeres (Spain), sherry-wine.  Sherris-Sack is cited in William Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 2 (2H4 IV.iii.95) Falstaff by himself says: “A good sherris-sack hath a two fold operation in it.” Felina Silver Robinson

Falstaff with big wine jar

#ShakespeareanWordOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #FelinaSilverRobinson, #Sherris-Sack