Archives For Poetry


Gallantry (n.)

Gallantry means gallants, nobility, gentry. Gallantry is cited in two of Williams Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida (TC.III.i.133) Paris said to Pandarus about those on the battlefield: “all the gallantry of troy.”

Troilus and Cressida in Pandarus’ orchard. Valentine Walter Bromley after Shakespeare.

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Taken from the Complete Works of William Shakespeare

Julius Caesar

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ

ACT III, SCENE III. A street.

Enter CINNA the poet
Cinna The Poet
I dreamt to-night that I did feast with Caesar,
And things unlucky charge my fantasy:
I have no will to wander forth of doors,
Yet something leads me forth.

Enter Citizens

First Citizen
What is your name?

Second Citizen
Whither are you going?

Third Citizen
Where do you dwell?

Fourth Citizen
Are you a married man or a bachelor?

Second Citizen
Answer every man directly.

First Citizen
Ay, and briefly.

Fourth Citizen
Ay, and wisely.

Third Citizen
Ay, and truly, you were best.

Cinna The Poet
What is my name? Whither am I going? Where do I
dwell? Am I a married man or a bachelor? Then, to
answer every man directly and briefly, wisely and
truly: wisely I say, I am a bachelor.

Second Citizen
That’s as much as to say, they are fools that marry:
you’ll bear me a bang for that, I fear. Proceed; directly.

Cinna The Poet
Directly, I am going to Caesar’s funeral.

First Citizen
As a friend or an enemy?

Cinna The Poet
As a friend.

Second Citizen
That matter is answered directly.

Fourth Citizen
For your dwelling,–briefly.

Cinna The Poet
Briefly, I dwell by the Capitol.

Third Citizen
Your name, sir, truly.

Cinna The Poet
Truly, my name is Cinna.

First Citizen
Tear him to pieces; he’s a conspirator.

Cinna The Poet
I am Cinna the poet, I am Cinna the poet.

Fourth Citizen
Tear him for his bad verses, tear him for his bad verses.

Cinna The Poet
I am not Cinna the conspirator.

Fourth Citizen
It is no matter, his name’s Cinna; pluck but his
name out of his heart, and turn him going.

Third Citizen
Tear him, tear him! Come, brands ho! fire-brands:
to Brutus’, to Cassius'; burn all: some to Decius’
house, and some to Casca’s; some to Ligarius': away, go!

Exeunt

On 5/28/15 – Join me in the continuation of

Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar


We are not lost

We are right where we need to be

In a place where we are not wanted

But willing to fight the battle

We will teach acceptance

We will teach an

Openness of

Heart and

Mind

Before

We

Are

Out

Of

Time

Openness of Heart and Mind©

by Felina Silver Robinson


Taken from the Complete Works of William Shakespeare

Julius Caesar

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ

ACT III, SCENE II. The Forum.

All
Most true. The will! Let’s stay and hear the will.

Antony
Here is the will, and under Caesar’s seal.
To every Roman citizen he gives,
To every several man, seventy-five drachmas.

Second Citizen
Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death.

Third Citizen
O royal Caesar!

ANTONY
Hear me with patience.

All
Peace, ho!

ANTONY 
Moreover, he hath left you all his walks,
His private arbours and new-planted orchards,
On this side Tiber; he hath left them you,
And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures,
To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves.
Here was a Caesar! when comes such another?

First Citizen
Never, never. Come, away, away!
We’ll burn his body in the holy place,
And with the brands fire the traitors’ houses.
Take up the body.

Second Citizen
Go fetch fire.

Third Citizen
Pluck down benches.

Fourth Citizen
Pluck down forms, windows, any thing.

Exeunt Citizens with the body

Antony
Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot,
Take thou what course thou wilt!

Enter a Servant

How now, fellow!

Servant
Sir, Octavius is already come to Rome.

Antony
Where is he?

Servant
He and Lepidus are at Caesar’s house.

Antony
And thither will I straight to visit him:
He comes upon a wish. Fortune is merry,
And in this mood will give us any thing.

Servant
I heard him say, Brutus and Cassius
Are rid like madmen through the gates of Rome.

ANTONY
Belike they had some notice of the people,
How I had moved them. Bring me to Octavius.

Exeunt

On 5/27/15 – Join me in the continuation of

Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar


Gainsaying (n.)

Gainsaying means denial, refusal. Gainsaying is cited in two of Williams Shakespeare’s play The Winter’s Tale (WT.I.ii.19) Leontes says to Polixenes, asking him to stay longer: “I’ll no gainsay i.e. I won’t be refused.”

The Winter’s Tale, Leontes Nurses Suspicions of His Wife Hermione and Their Visitor Polixenes Giclee.

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Then

Untamed Desires, Harsh Words

Passionate Moment, Salty Tears

Daring Acts of Love, Bittersweet Memories

Blue Skies, Dreams Gone By

Now

Dark Skies, Salty Rivers

No More Kisses, No More Wishes

Heart of Steel, Closed Off To Love

Then and Now a Heart in Pieces©

by Felina Silver Robinson


Non Accepting

Finger Pointing

Never Changing

Bigoted

Hater of difference

Lonely

Soulless

Monster

The Ugliness of Racism©

by Felina Silver Robinson