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Raymond Valas


USS Vandergrift contacted the sailboat around 4 p.m. Saturday 900 miles from land

A family stranded in the middle of the ocean has boarded a Navy frigate tasked with saving them and a sick baby. NBC 7’s Diana Guevara has the latest updates.

Watch Report: Watching Diana7a0406

A San Diego family and their seriously ill baby, who were stuck on a sailboat  hundreds of miles off the Mexico coast, have boarded a Navy rescue ship Sunday morning, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

USS Vandegrift arrived near the sailboat at 1 a.m. and waited until first light to rescue the family.

Around 8 a.m., sailors used an inflatable boat to bring the infant, family and four California Air National Guard pararescumen aboard the Vandergrift.

Two weeks ago, Eric and Charlotte Kaufman, along with their 1-year-old and 3-year-old daughters, set sail on an around-the-world journey.

But Thursday, they set out a satellite distress call, saying the youngest girl had become violently sick. On top of that, their boat had lost its steering and communication abilities.

In a large coordinated effort, the California Air National Guard’s 129th Rescue Wing worked with the Navy to send four pararescuemen, who jumped from a plane into the ocean and climbed aboard the Rebel Heart to treat the girl.

By Saturday, they said the baby’s condition had stabilized while they waited for further transportation from the Vandergrift.

According to a Facebook post from Charlotte’s sister, Sariah English, the Navy frigate made contact with the family just after 4 p.m. Saturday.

USS Vandergrift stayed about five miles from the boat through Saturday night as its crew planned how to get the family off the boat.

“The bottom line is the safety and security of not only the family members that are on board, but also of all the personnel that are involved to save the infant. That is paramount,” said 2nd Lt. Roderick Bersamina with the 129th Rescue Wing.

The family reportedly was given one trip to get their things off the boat – as much as they can carry — before they left it behind in the ocean.

They did not sink the Rebel Heart; instead, they tagged it and let it float along.

The Kaufmans should return to San Diego on Monday, English said. They requested to stay at a Navy base hotel and then travel to New Mexico, where English lives.

Because the family will have to abandon most of their possessions, English is working with friends in San Diego to collect donations to give the Kaufmans when they arrive.

It’s unclear what caused the baby to fall ill. English told NBC 7 that she had diarrhea, fevers, and a large rash and had been vomiting.

In a post on her blog, Charlotte had said on March 11 that both she and her 1-year-old daughter had tested positive for salmonella.

Officials have not announced where they are taking the baby to be treated.


By Anita Fritz, The Recorder

Greenfield Recorder

ORANGE, Mass. — It was 1948, three years after the end of World War II, when Earl Shaffer, a U.S. Army veteran from Pennsylvania, hiked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail, something no one else had done to that point.

More than 14,000 people have hiked the entire trail since Shaffer, and U.S. Army National Guard veteran Joe Young of Orange says he hopes to be one of the next.

Many have attempted the 2,180-mile trek — some have finished, some have not. They’ve done it for many reasons: the challenge, the sheer exhilaration or just to be able to say they did it.

Others, like Young, decide they want to do it to find the piece of their soul they lost somewhere along the way — Young says he lost his in Iraq.

The 61-year-old veteran retired after spending 42 1/ 2 years in the National Guard. He suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, a type of anxiety disorder that occurs after someone has gone through an extreme emotional trauma that involves the threat of injury or death.

It’s obvious that he doesn’t like to talk about the specifics of what he saw in Iraq when he was deployed from 2003 to 2004 and again from 2005 to 2006. He served at Abu Ghraib prison and says if someone tries to push him too hard into talking about it and he starts to feel too uncomfortable, he simply leaves the room.

“I hope that sometime during my six-month hike with 13 other veterans I find that piece of my soul I’m looking for,” he said just days before he left for Georgia on March 14.

Young planned to begin on Spring Mountain in Georgia on St. Patrick’s Day and spend the next six months hiking to Mount Katahdin in Maine. He expects to cross Mount Greylock in North Adams in late July and reach Katahdin’s summit in September.

Last year, while perusing the Internet, he found the Warrior Hike’s “Walk Off the War” program for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan and immediately contacted organizers.

“I’m in good shape and am an avid hiker, so I thought this would be perfect for me,” he says. “I needed something.”

The veteran, who is in the best shape of his life, according to himself and his wife, says he found it difficult re-adjusting to civilian life when he retired from the National Guard several years ago.

“You’re up early every day when you’re in the guard and you have a purpose each day,” he says. “After I retired I was still getting up early, but I didn’t know what to do with myself.”

That’s when Young says he found VetNet at Greenfield Community College, a club that helps veteran students return to their communities and school, and decided to enroll in college.

“I didn’t want to get a specific degree,” he says. “I wanted to do it for fun and learning. I took a lot of history classes, because that seemed really interesting to me.”

He says it took time to adjust to school.

“I had to sit in the back of the room, because I didn’t want anyone sitting behind me,” says Young. “You learn to do that when you’re deployed, especially to a place like Iraq.”

Young says there are plenty of groups that help returning veterans adjust, apply for benefits, and more, but veterans have to know where to go. He says a veteran should start with his or her local veterans agent and expand their search from there.

“Go online, too,” he says. “That’s where I found Warrior Hike. There are plenty of people out there who want to help.”

Like Shaffer did in 1948, Young says he plans to work out the sights, sounds and losses of Iraq on his hike. He says he won’t have a lot of contact with his family.

“I’ll have my cellphone, but I only plan to use it on weekends or in an emergency,” he says. “That’s just a choice I’m making so I can experience this to the fullest.”

Young says the 14 veterans, including himself, are expected to hike eight to 14 miles a day. They will each be carrying sleeping bags, tents, food, clothes and other necessities.

“We won’t all be sleeping in the same spot,” he says. “Some will move faster than others, but the end of the week, we are expected to be in the same spot.”

Young says the veterans will have the opportunity to stay with other veterans in their homes on weekends.

“We’ll be greeted each weekend by veterans from different VFWs, American Legions, and other veteran groups,” says Young. “I hear they are very helpful and hospitable.”

According to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, which oversees the entire trail, statistics show that about one in four people who set out to hike from Georgia to Maine make it, while the rest return home for many different reasons, including injury, family matters, bad experiences or they run out of money. The hike typically takes from four to seven months to complete.

“I’m really looking forward to this being a therapeutic cleansing for me,” says Young. “I want to get my head back where it belongs.”

He says he is looking forward most to hiking with other veterans who understand what he has been through.

“We’ll be able to help each other,” he says.

“I also want to find some enjoyment,” says Young. “I have it here at home with my wife, and my kids and grandchildren, when they visit. I find it on my motorcycle. Now, I want to find it out there, on my own.”

Two years ago, two veterans started the Warrior Hike and finished the Appalachian trek. Last year, 12 others joined those two and did the same.

“We’re a determined bunch,” says Young. “When you think about what some of us have been through in war, you realize this shouldn’t be all that bad.”

Recognizing the physical, mental and spiritual benefits of long-distance hiking, Warrior Hike has partnered with the conservancy, the Continental Divide Trail Coalition and the Pacific Crest Trail Association to create the “Walk Off the War” program, which takes place all over the United States.

The program is designed to support combat veterans who are transitioning from military service by hiking through American’s national scenic trails.

Young says he was provided all of the necessary equipment and supplies by Warrior Hike. He has to supply his own food and clothes.

He says the six-month hike will allow him to decompress and come to terms with his wartime experiences, while learning to use the outdoors as an alternative form of therapy.

“It’s the camaraderie that I am looking forward to most,” says Young. “That runs so deep when you are serving in the military and then you get home and you miss it.”

Young says he has also been told by many veterans that everyone eventually has a good cry.

“I haven’t had my good cry yet,” he says. “I’m hoping it happens on the trail.”

According to Warrior Hike, the “thru-hikes” and the interaction veterans have with other veterans and members of trail towns’ veteran organizations and local communities along the way restores their faith in humanity and builds a network of lifelong friendships and relationships.

Young, who was born in Winchendon, grew up in Orange, where he lives today. He attended Orange schools and graduated with a degree in agriculture from Smith Vocational Agricultural High School in Northampton.

The retired sergeant-major plans to write about his experiences each day. He says he will not cut his hair or shave until he returns home — he started growing his beard six weeks ago.

“It’s the first time I’ve had a beard in my life,” he says. “I hope there are going to be a lot of firsts for me over the next six months.”

Young’s trail name is Quabbin Trekker, and in his first entry, dated Jan. 25, he writes, “I have decided to dedicate this hike in honor of all my brothers and sisters that have paid the ultimate price.” He ends each of the entries he has made since then, “Onward, upward, forward.”


See Video

A mountain climber is recovering after a serious fall near Linville Gorge in Pisgah National Forest in North Carolina on Monday. A helicopter rescue saved the climber’s life.

The 23-year-old climber tumbled approximately 50 feet while climbing Shortoff Mountain, a spot known for its rough terrain. A group of people saw him fall and called for help.

Rescuers were unable to reach him by foot. The National Guard sent a Black Hawk helicopter with a four-person crew. By the time it arrived, the man had been clinging to a small ledge on the side of the mountain for more than three hours.

The rescue played out on live television. As the helicopter hovered above, rescuers were able to reach the injured dehydrated man. They attached him to a backboard and hoisted him 150 feet into the helicopter.

The climber was stable and talking, but in pain, Chris Hendricks, operations supervisor of Gaston, N.C., Emergency Medical Services said. He added, “He was hurting pretty good.”

The climber was flown to Mission Health in Asheville, N.C., about 60 miles away. The severity of his injuries is unknown.

Capt. Darrell Scoggins, commander of Black Hawk Company, said, “We pulled him out of a sticky situation, and we were just happy we could be there and help him.”


More officers, restrictions planned for April race after bombings 

BOSTON — Enhanced Boston Marathon security measures announced Monday morning include restrictions on what spectators may have along the 26.2-mile course.

Watch report

An estimated 3,500 police officers — many in uniform, but some undercover — will be along the course, MEMA Director Kurt Schwartz said. The number of surveillance cameras will also be increased.

“We are enlisting the support of runners and spectators in ensuring we have a safe event. We are promoting the simple slogan, ‘If you see something, say something,'”  Schwartz said.

Spectators along the route are being discouraged from bringing backpacks or any similar item carried over the shoulder, coolers, glass containers or cans, handbags lager than 12 inches by 12 inches by 6 inches, large blankets and costumes that cover the face.

“If you are going to carry personal items, we urge you to carry them in clear plastic bags,” Schwartz said.

About 130 National Guardsmen will march as participants, wearing BAA bibs in groups of 10.

The security announcements are in addition to measures revealed last month to protect the runners and spectators.

No bags will be allowed at marathon venues or on the buses runners take from Boston to the start line in Hopkinton. Several viewing areas in Hopkinton will also have heightened security rules.

“We are confident that the overall experience of runners and spectators will not be impacted and all will enjoy a fun day,” Schwartz said.

Last year, two bombs exploded near the finish line of the race, killing three people and injuring more than 260 others.

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