Archives For Miners


1. USDA expanding release of parasitic wasp to combat citrus disease

Predatory wasps fight Asian citrus psyllids

2. Samsung apologizes to sickened chip workers

In this photo released by Samsung Electronics Co., Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Kwon Oh-hyun speaks during a briefing in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, May 14, 2014. Samsung Electronics Co. apologized and promised compensation to chip factory workers who suffered cancers linked to chemical exposure, a rare win for families and activists seven years after the death of a 23-year-old employee from leukemia galvanized a movement to hold the company to account. Photo: Samsung Electronics Co., AP / Samsung Electronics Co.

3. Tunisia’s poorest towns left to shoulder burden of hazardous toxic landfill sites

Waste dumped at landfill sites represents a growing threat to poor communities in Tunisia, polluting air and water supplies
MDG : Landfill in Tunisia : Dumping garbage in Le Kef

4. From mining to urban sprawl: Humans threaten most Chilean ecosystems

Environment Ministry study says human activity endangers 55 percent of Chile’s natural areas, with populated central and southern regions most at risk.
Mining operations in northern Chile threaten to drain the region’s scarce water sources, like the small lakes and lagoons in the Atacama salt flat, the second largest of its kind in the world, pictured here.  Photo by Francesco Mocellin / Wikicommons

5. Kitty litter eyed as possible culprit in New Mexico radiation leak

6. Unintended Consequences: Fracking and the Flow of Drugs

The South Texas oil and gas boom has provided new opportunities for smugglers — but also new ways to stop them.

 

7. The Water Tunnel Boondoggle 

Experts say the eye-popping costs of Governor Brown’s plan to build two giant water tunnels far outweigh the financial benefits. And taxpayers may be left holding the bag.

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8. Oil giant Citgo gets off easy in criminal case

9. Group urges tobacco companies to protect U.S. child workers

10. Are pesticides linked to health problems in Argentina?

Viviana Perez and her daughter Nadia

 


1. Oil and Gas: Spills up 18 percent in U.S. in 2013

2. Frogs’ immune systems weakened by chemicals, study finds

3. Toxic Plumes: The Dark Side of Silicon Valley

4. Getting Beyond Just Wheat, Corn and Rice

Some uncommon grains have environmental advantages that could be beneficial in a changing world. But making the uncommon common can be difficult.
Mature millet in field

5. ‘Cancer villages’ alert China to urgent water crisis

6. Treasure Island: The People of Tangier Their Life, Land and Heritage Could Wash Away

7. Trove Of Toxic Mercury Lurks In Arctic Sea Ice

Environment: Ice-core analysis shows more methylmercury will enter Arctic food chain as climate change speeds up ice melt
Photo of researchers sampling ice cores from an Artic sea-ice floe

8. Environment: Scientist Warn of Rising Oceans from Polar Melt

9. Wildfires: Southwest struggles to adapt to year-round fire season

Oklahoma firefighter

10. Safety debate eyes taming Bakken crude before it hits rails

Safety debate eyes taming Bakken crude before it hits rails Photo: SHANNON STAPLETON

11. Feds Reach Settlement Agreement To Recall Buckyballs

BUCKYBALLS

12. Children of Smoking Addicts More Likely to Become Heavy Smokers

The study is the first to give an intergenerational view of the impact a parent’s behavior has on children.

A person smokes a cigarette.

13. Woman, Sterile From Mom’s Pregnancy Drug at 25, Gets Mother’s Day Miracle Baby

PHOTO: Judith Helfand and her healthy baby girl Theodora, who arrived in April, 2014.

14. Mine Incident: Two deaths confirmed at Patriot Coal mine in Boone County, WV

Two miners killed in Patriot Coal mine in Boone County, WV


More than 200 illegal miners are trapped in an abandoned gold shaft near Johannesburg, South Africa, local officials said Sunday.

The miners have been in the mine near Benoni Central Business District, about 30 miles outside of Johannesburg, since Saturday, South African emergency services officials said.

Paramedics and rescuers were figuring out on Sunday how to rescue the miners without collapsing the ground around them, the emergency services division said.“Numerous” rescue vehicles and lifting equipment was deployed, and workers lifted a large rock from the opening of the mine, South African emergency services reported.

Police said they were monitoring the field when they heard cries coming from the mine and discovered the 200 were trapped below layers of boulders.

Werner Vermaak of ER24 emergency services told Reuters rescuers were communicating with a group of about 30 miners trapped below the surface by fallen boulders at the old mine site in Benoni.

“They told us there are about 200 others trapped further below,” Vermaak said.”It’s an abandoned mine shaft in the middle of the public veld (open fields) … it was not a blocked-off area,” he said, adding that no injuries or casualties had been reported so far.

Emergency service crews are trying to lower water down to the miners and said paramedics will assess the miners once they are freed and provide necessary medical attention.

Illegal mining is common in South Africa, and miners often live underground in dangerous conditions in order unearth precious ore.

 Heavily armed officers present at the illegal mine in Benoni. Rescue has begun. ER24 on scene and ready. pic.twitter.com/OjjSwWj3Py

- ER24 EMS (Pty) Ltd ® (@ER24EMS) February 16, 2014

— Rohit Kachroo and Elisha Fieldstadt