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1. Cherokee Nation to Receive Bison Herd

Courtesy InterTribal Buffalo Council
Bison from Badlands National Park, above, will be relocated to the Cherokee Nation on October 9.

2. Video: Stunning Lunar Eclipse Turns Hunter’s Moon Blood Red

Fred Espinak, NASA
The total lunar eclipse occurring the night of October 7-8, 2014, promises to be as spectacular as the one above, which occurred in April.

3. Cherokee Casino Employees Helping Keep Oklahoma Roads Clean

Courtesy Cherokee Nation
Cherokee Casino Fort Gibson employee volunteers clear trash and debris from alongside State Highway 62.

4. Glenn Beck Dons Headdress: ‘I Think it Works on Me’

Blaze TV
Glenn Beck wears a Native headdress on his morning show on October 6, 2014.

5. Indian Cowboy Rodeo Ropes in Hundreds, Gears Up for Next Year

Morongo Indian Cowboy Rodeo

6. Wrenches, Wetsuits and the First Duck Dynasty: 5 More Game-Changing Native Inventions

Thinkstock
Who knew? Even though diabetes did not come to Turtle Island until the settlers did, indigenous ingenuity immediately kicked in, with the use of this plant as a remedy.

7. Election: Indian Health System Is on the Ballot

Why Indian country needs the Affordable Care Act in one chart: Spending on Indian health has been historically underfunded. The Affordable Care Act makes it easier for Medicaid and insurance money to be used at local Indian health clinics and hospitals. (Chart is from a new report “Past, Present, and Future Threats to American Indian, Alaska Native Health by Donald Warne, MD, MPH, and Linda Bane Frizzell, PhD.)

8. On the Campaign Trail: Wisc.’s Mary Burke Stressing Education and Jobs

Courtesy burkforwisconsin.com
Wisconsin Gov. Candidate Mary Burke

9. The High Cost of Tribal Banishment

10. Chumash Inter-Tribal Pow Wow Offers Healing and High-end Vendors

Diego James Robles
A traditional Aztec dancer performs during an exhibition dance.

11. 2015 Calendar Features Dazzling Paintings of Native Life and Culture

Courtesy Robert Peters
Detail of ‘Hopi Girls,’ a painting by Robert Peters based on an Edward S. Curtis photograph. It’s the May image in his ‘Thirteen Moons’ calendar. Courtesy the artist.

12. Northwest Tribes Celebrate Highest Fall Fish Returns to Columbia River Basin in 75 Years: CRITFC

Bonneville Power Administration
Salmon observation window at the Bonneville Dam.
Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/10/06/northwest-tribes-celebrate-highest-fall-fish-returns-columbia-river-basin-75-years-critfc

Who’s responsible?

By Felina Silver Robinson

Yesterday shortly after losing his job at Vaughan Foods plant in Oklahoma City, Alton Nolen headed over to the human resources section of the administrative building and took it upon himself to behead Colleen Hufford. He then proceeded to stab Traci Johnson multiple times at which time he was shot by Mark Vaughan, who is a reserve sheriff’s deputy and the company’s chief operating officer.

It was initially said that this beheading may have been inspired by the media’s communication of the ISIS incidents. Nolen is a Muslim convert and like many other muslims has been working to convert others to Islam. While this may be true no one can assume that any of his actions are at all related to ISIS or any other threats currently out there. It seems that the FBI and other key officials are doing a great job in trying to figure out exactly what the true motive was behind all this, aside from the obvious firing moments before the gruesome attack.

I hate pointing fingers, but I have to say that while it is important to keep readers informed of what is going on in the world, it often feels like the more violent something is, the more the media shows you all the details. If every station out there is repeatedly televising, posting, and reporting the same gorey details of the most violent acts, of course its going to condition others and set in place the reasoning to motivate them to start their own trail of violence. Most often, the acts mirror the events they’ve seen and heard about, minus the ransom or televised threats.

If there were regulations in place that limited the number of televised occasions by each news station, maybe it would be harder to plant the seed. There is not much that can be done about the internet, because people search for what they are interested in. TV is somewhat easier to control. Let’s not kid ourselves though, the world has a large number of people with devastating mental health issues of which many are not even being treated for whether it be due to a lack of insurance coverage, money problems or maybe even accessibility. We don’t know, but when we know we have the power to control some part of what’s going on, we must work to do our best to prevent events such as the beheading of innocent bystanders, rapes, arson, robbery and the like.

It might be hard to hear, but we as a society have nurtured criminals by giving them access to the tools and ideas to commit the crimes they commit. Then, despite our best efforts to put them away for their sins in many cases, the guilty go free, while their victims live a lifetime of pain and often end up becoming criminals seeking revenge on their attackers.

It’s time to take notice of what’s really happening and what role the Media and others are playing in what happens and how it happens.


My ThrowBack Thursday Poem/Photo of the Day

(09/04/14)

College Days©

Felina - Newbury College July 1987

Saturdays from 9-5

I belonged to Newbury College

With friends from all over

Gathered to learn

All that we could about

Business

Accounting

Law

Psychology

Economics

Marketing

Public Relations

Human Resources Management

Great American History

English Composition

And

More

All

To get a better job

To get you a bigger title

To make you feel more whole

To find professional happiness

Colleges Days

Full of fun

Full of learning

Full of stress

Full of life long friendships

Hoping for change

And

New Direction

Happy to see College Days

Come and Go

Copyright 2014

College Days©

Felina Silver Robinson


Student recorded incident on video

NEW BEDFORD, Mass. — A New Bedford teacher who had a chair thrown at her by a student now says her job is in jeopardy.

Watch the full report

High school teacher Joanne Maura said she received a letter from administrators telling her she failed to preform her “responsibilities as a teacher at New Bedford High School” and could be terminated.

“I feel like I’ve been assaulted again,” she said.

The letter said she did not inform the administration of the nature, details and severity of the incident.

Marua told NewsCenter 5 that after the student threw the chair at her, other teachers ran to the room, along with an administrator and the school resource officer.

Another student in the classroom was recording the outburst and posted it on YouTube.

Maura said she took the student’s phone away during class and he began yelling at her to return it.

The video shows the student pick up the chair and hurl it toward the teacher.

It smashed against her desk.

The superintendent would not comment on the details of the investigation.


Second store in Massachusetts will open in late April

NEWTON, Mass. — Wegmans announced Tuesday it would open its second location in Massachusetts on Sunday, April 27.

The Chestnut Hill Wegmans is an approximately 80,000 square-foot supermarket that includes a second-level 10,500 square-foot shop offering wine, beer and spirits.

The company says the liquor, beer and wine portion of the store will open to the public on Saturday, March 29.

The company says it is still searching for full and part-time employees for the front end, as well as the grocery and prepared foods departments.

Wegmans Chestnut Hill is located on Route 9 and is part of Chestnut Hill Square.


By Julia Spitz, MetroWest Daily News

Julia Spitz/MetroWest Daily News

BELLINGHAM, Mass. — The secrets to bagging groceries are just “common sense,” Sal Pilla said as he grouped refrigerated items in one sack and fruits and vegetables in another on checkout lane 6 on a recent Friday morning.

But working at the Bellingham Market Basket may be part of the secret of his success, our news partners at the MetroWest Daily News reported.

After all, not many bag boys are 93.

Not that bagging is his only role at the Stallbrook Marketplace supermarket.

“He does everything,” said store manager Steve Dunn.

Nor are his three shifts a week the only times you’ll find him at work.

“He’ll come in even on his days off, directing traffic (of shoppers to a less crowded checkout line), taking the bakery trash out. … He comes in Sundays after church, talks to all the customers,” said Dunn.

“Sometimes he has more energy than the kids.”

Pilla, who keeps cookies in his pocket “to give to certain people,” was 77 when he started the Market Basket job.

By then, he had worked for Draper’s for 30 years in the foundry — “They called me ‘Scrap Iron’ when he served as a sergeant in the Army National Guard — and had also been a Bellingham firefighter for 20 years.

When he first visited the store, he seemed to know just about all the shoppers, so “they asked if I wanted to work here,” and his late wife, Blanche, agreed it might be a good idea.

“I’m a people person,” said Pilla. “I can’t sit in the corner by myself. I just can’t.”

When he’s not working, he can often be found dancing.

Back in the day, he cut a rug at local hotspots like Norumbega Park and Lake Pearl.

Now you’re more likely to find him at the Uxbridge VFW, Medway Senior Center or, if he gets off work in time on Friday afternoons, the Holliston Senior Center’s Big Band sessions.

He’ll do the polka and line dances, but prefers the waltz.

“I like to do together dancing,” he said. “I like to hold them tight.”

His dancing days started early, back in Milford, where he grew up.

“My father played the accordion. My sister and I used to dance. And I haven’t stopped.”

Milford was also where he learned, when he went to get his driver’s license, his real first name is Salvatore.

Old friends like former state Rep. Marie Parente still call him “Johnny,” since his family always called him by his middle name in honor of an uncle who died. “You could never call me Sal in front of my sister,” he said.

It’s also where he found his first job, as a stock boy at F.W. Woolworth’s.

His wife-to-be “was my next-door neighbor. I told her I’d marry her when I came back” from World War II. At 20, and a member of the National Guard, “I was an old man” compared to many of his fellow GIs.

Serving with the 5th Armored Division in Europe, “that’s when I met George” Patton. “He was a soldier’s soldier,” who “told us ‘You don’t salute in the field.'”

Pilla, who served in “D-Day Plus One” and the Battle of the Bulge, remembers Patton or one of his staff officers was frequently on the front lines.

The bonds forged in combat are not forgotten.

“We knew each other. Everybody took care of everybody,” said the man whose dog tag remains on his key ring almost 70 years after the war’s end.

He returned home and married Blanche, and the couple lived in Milford for about eight years before moving to Bellingham, where they raised two sons.

“I volunteered with the fire department at first,” he said, but later became a lieutenant and ladder instructor. While most of those he trained are now retired, “they remember the old man got them up on the roof.”

At 93, his doctor tells him “don’t change a thing you’re doing,” so he still drives, though not at night, and he still shows up to work, even on days like a recent Friday, when a light snow blanketed the parking lot and temperatures struggled to get out of the teens.

“I don’t have stress,” he said.

He does, however, have an occasional word of advice for his teen coworkers.

No matter what your age, “You serve the customers. They don’t serve you.”


Will pay for nearly 6K job-training opportunities

BOSTON —Gov. Deval Patrick announced Saturday that Massachusetts is investing $12 million of state funds into a program that will pay for nearly 6,000 summer job-training opportunities.

The funding for the program overseen by YouthWorks – a state-subsidized jobs initiative for at-risk youth aged 14 to 21 – is part of the state budget proposal for the 2015 financial year, Patrick said.

The investment represents a $3 million increase over the budget for the 2014 financial year.

“These jobs are essential to providing our Commonwealth’s at-risk youth with a better opportunity for a brighter future, while reducing youth violence across the Commonwealth,” Patrick said. “I look forward to working with our partners to ensure that YouthWorks remains fully funded this summer, so we can continue our commitment to the next generation.”

Last summer, the program provided job training to 5,175 young people in 31 cities.

The YouthWorks program has grown steadily since Patrick took office, expanding in funding from $4.7 million in the summer of 2007 to $10 million in the summer of 2013. This year’s proposed funding would be the largest investment in the program’s history.

Patrick’s administration also announced that it will preserve funding for YouthBuild at $2 million and maintain its support for the School to Career Connective Activities program at $2.7 million. YouthBuild helps low-income residents ages 16 to 24 earn high school diplomas or GEDs by learning job skills building affordable housing. School to Career Connecting Activities establishes a partnership between schools and businesses and provides work-based learning experiences for students.

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