Archives For History


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

“Athamas”, in Greek mythology, king of the prehistoric Minyans in the ancient Boeotian city of Orchomenus. His first wife was the goddess Nephele. But later Athamas became enamored of Ino, the daughter of CADMUS, and neglected Nephele, who disappeared in anger. Athamas and Ino incurred the wrath of the goddess HERA because Ino had nursed DIONYSUS. Athamas went mad and slew one of his sons, Learchus; Ino, to escape, threw herself into the sea with her other son, Melicertes. Both were afterward worshiped as marine divinities—Ino as LEUCOTHEA, Melicertes as Palaemon. Athamas fled from Boeotia and finally settled at Phthiotis in Thessaly.

The oldest myth of Argonauts is ahead of the Trojan Legend (II Millennium Part I). Athamas the Minyan, a founder of Halos in Thessaly.

(Comeback on 2/28/15 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Athanasian Creed”.

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Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

“Athaliah”also spelled Athalia, in the OLD TESTAMENT, the daughter of AHAB and JEZEBEL and wife of Jeham, king of JUDAH. After the death of Ahaziah, her son, Athaliah usurped the throne and reigned for seven years. She massacred all the members of the royal house of Judah (2 Kings 11:1-3), except Joash. A successful revolution was organized in favor of Joash, and she was killed.

Athaliah

(Comeback on 2/27/15 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Athamas”.

#ReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #Athaliah


Retro News Wednesday Just For You

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

1) Sequins, retro elegance, Cinderella jostle for attention at second day of London Fashion Week

The Associated Press

2) Chicago’s Paradise of Retro Toys

3) Alum was victim of Waltham triple homicide

4) Brookline Clinic Shootings: December 30, 1994

Planned Parenthood buffer zone in Vermont. Photo: Adam Fagen

5) The endurance of Camelia Sadat

6) The Man in the Rockefeller Suit

7) Women and the Warsaw Ghetto: A Moment to Decide Marjorie Wall Bingham

Figure 1

8) Respectful Insolence

9) Patriots & Traitors: What Can We Learn from the Lessons of History?

Benedict Arnold and Peggy Shippen

10) American Airlines Flight 11 Manifest


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

“Ate”, Greek semi divine figure who induced ruinous actions. She made ZEUS take a hasty OATH that resulted in the hero HERACLES becoming subject to Eurystheus, ruler of Mycenae. Zeus then cast Ate out of Olympus; she remained on earth, working evil and mischief. She was followed by the Litai (“Prayers”—personifications of the supplications offered up to the gods), the old and crippled daughters of Zeus, who repaired the harm done by her.

(Comeback on 2/26/15 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Athaliah”.

#ReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #Ate


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

“Atargatis”, great goddess of northern Syria; her chief SANCTUARY was at Hierapolis (modern Manbij), northeast of Aleppo, where she was worshiped with her consort, HADAD. Her ancient temple there was rebuilt about 300 BCE by Queen Stratonice, and her cult spread to various parts of the Greek world, where the goddess was generally regarded as a form of APHRODITE.

In nature she resembled her Phoenician counterpart, ASTARTE; she also showed some kinship with the Anatolian Cybele. Primarily she was a goddess of fertility, but as the baalat (mistress”) of her city and people, she was also responsible for their protection and well-being. Hence she was commonly portrayed wearing the mural crown and holding a sheaf of grain, while the lions who supported her throne suggest her strength and power over nature.

symbol of syrian goddess Atargatis

(Comeback on 2/25/15 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Ate”.

#ReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #Atargatis


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

“Atalanta”, in Greek mythology, a renowned and swift-footed huntress, probably a parallel and less important form of the goddess ARTEMIS. Traditionally, she was the daughter of Schoeneus of Boeotia or of Iasus and Clymene of Arcadia. She was left to die at birth but was suckled by a she-bear; later she took part in the Calydonian boar hunt and, more famously, offered to marry anyone who could outrun her—but those whom she overtook she speared.

In one race Hippomenes (or Milanion) was given three of the golden apples of the HESPERIDES by APHRODITE; when he dropped them, Atalanta stopped to pick them up and so lost the race. Their son was Parthenopaeus, who later fought as one of the SEVEN AGAINST THEBES after the death of King OEDIPUS. Atalanta and her husband, proving ungrateful to Aphrodite, copulated in a shrine of the goddess Cybele (or of ZEUS), for which they were turned into lions.

Greek myth of Atalanta and Hippomenes

(Comeback on 2/24/15 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Atargatis”.

#ReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #Atalanta


Taken from the Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of World Religions

Here is a dose of daily religion from A to Z.

Today’s religious topic is as follows:

“Ashvamedha”also spelled ashvamedha, or ashwamedha (Sanskrit: “horse sacrifice”), grandest of the Vedic religious rites of ancient India, performed by a king to celebrate his preeminence. The ceremony is described in detail in various Vedic writings, particularly the Satapatha Brahmana. A hand-picked stallion was allowed to roam freely for a year under the protection of a royal guard. If the horse entered a foreign country, its ruler had either to fight or to submit. If the horse was not captured during the year, it was brought back to the capital accompanied by the rulers of the lands it entered, and then sacrificed at a great public ceremony. The wandering horse was said to symbolize the sun in its journey over the world and, consequently, the power of the king over the whole earth. On successfully carrying out a horse sacrifice, the king could assume the title of cakravartin (“universal monarch”). The rite ensured the prosperity and fertility of the entire kingdom.

In historical times the practice was condemned by the Buddha and seems to have suffered a decline, but it was revived by Pusyamitra Sunga (reigned 187-151 BCE). Samudra Gupta (c. 380 CE) issued coins in commemoration of his successful completion of an asvamedha. It may have continued as late as the 11th century, when it is said to have taken place in the Coja Empire.

Ashwamedha

(Comeback on 2/23/15 and continue to learn about religion. Tomorrow you’ll read and learn more about “Atalanta”.

#ReligiousTopicOfTheDay, #poetsareangels.com, @FelinaSilver, #Ashvamedha