Archives For Exercise


1. What causes muscle twitch? 15 possible conditions

2. 10 Ways to Relieve and Prevent Joint Pain

3. 12 Secrets to a Deeper Sleep

Go to bed prepared, and try these amazing sleep secrets to have a longer lasting, deeper rest.

4. 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Headaches

Find out some surprising reasons why your head is pounding

5. 12 Devastating Health Effects of Smoking

New Evidence May Be the Most Convincing Yet

6. Protect Your Brain Health, Decade by Decade

7. Living with COPD

8. Surprising Reasons You’re Gaining Weight

9. Sneak Peek: Dr. Oz Explains a Silent Heart Attack

10. Caregiver stress fact sheet


Fight Flare-Ups With an Arthritis Diet

Some of the best arthritis remedies are actually found in the foods you eat. Learn the 10 foods that help and hurt arthritis.


Losing weight isn’t easy. There are many steps to getting there. I fight a daily battle myself. Giving birth to six amazing children while also suffering six miscarriages takes a toll on a womans body. Many of wish we could just blink our eyes and the weight would just melt away. This is far-fetched and unrealistic. So we look for articles to read, food to eat and any type of exercise that will help bring the weight down and hopefully keep it off. No one thing will work on its own.  I would like to share with you some articles and recipes that will at least educate you and help you decide what’s next in your fight to stay “fit and healthy”.  Good Luck! Felina Silver Robinson

1. Why caloric restriction alone won’t help you live longer

2. To Your Good Health: Next steps on weight-loss journey

3. Overcoming Obesity – and Making it Last

Even a modest weight loss can improve overall health.

obesity

4. Think you’re eating healthy? You’re probably not.

5. Lose Weight Fast: How to Do It Safely

Sick of crash diets and fad diets? Follow these healthy tips.
fruit and vegetables on scale
What kind of exercise — and how much — is best when you’re trying to lose weight?
woman power walking
Nine Best Exercises for Weight Loss Sixteen Best Exercises for Weight Loss
9. 13 Fat Releasing Foods to Lose Weight Fast

Liz Vaccariello, author of The Digest Diet, explains how you can lose weight fast by eating foods you already shop for, as certain foods, actions, and activities can gently shift your body into fat release mode.

fat releasers protein


1. Protein-enhanced food: the latest health craze

Protein powder is being added to foods from bread to ice-cream, as it makes you
feel fuller for longer.  But do we really need more protein in our diets?
A basketful of high-protein food
The more time you spend sitting, the greater the chances of dying from heart
disease or cancer, having a stroke or becoming diabetic. Even GPs now advocate
standing during consultations.
Doctor standing up
antibiotics
people walking
Too much, too little slumber linked to raised number of sick days, researchers say
HealthDay news image

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Running regularly has long been linked to a host of health benefits, including weight control, stress reduction, better blood pressure and cholesterol.However, recent research suggests there may a point of diminishing returns with running.

A number of studies have suggested that a “moderate” running regimen — a total of two to three hours per week, according to one expert — appears best for longevity, refuting the typical “more is better” mantra for physical activity.

 

The researchers behind the newest study on the issue say people who get either no exercise orhigh-mileage runners both tend to have shorter lifespans than moderate runners. But the reasons why remain unclear, they added.The new study seems to rule out cardiac risk or the use of certain medications as factors.

“Our study didn’t find any differences that could explain these longevity differences,” said Dr. Martin Matsumura, co-director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Lehigh Valley Health Network in Allentown, Pa.

Matsumura presented the findings Sunday at the American College of Cardiology’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Studies presented at medical meetings are typically viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Matsumura and his colleagues evaluated data from more than 3,800 men and women runners, average age 46. They were involved in the Masters Running Study, a web-based study of training and health information on runners aged 35 and above. Nearly 70 percent reported running more than 20 miles a week.

The runners supplied information on their use of common painkillers called NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen/Aleve), which have been linked with heart problems, as well as aspirin, known to be heart-protective. The runners also reported on known heart risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, family history of heart disease and smoking history.

None of these factors explained the shorter lives of high-mileage runners, the researchers said. Use of NSAIDs was actually more common in runners who ran less than 20 miles weekly, Matsumura’s team noted. “The study negates the theory that excessive use of NSAIDs may be causing this loss of longevity among high-mileage runners,” Matsumura said.

So what’s the advice to fitness-oriented Americans?

“I certainly don’t tell patients ‘Don’t run,’ ” Matsumura said. But, he does tell high-mileage runners to stay informed about new research into the mileage-lifespan link as more becomes known.

“What we still don’t understand is defining the optimal dose of running for health and longevity,” he said.

Even though the heart disease risk factors couldn’t explain the shorter longevity of high-mileage runners, there do seem to be potentially life-shortening ill effects from that amount of running, said Dr. James O’Keefe, director of preventive cardiology at the Mid-American Heart Institute in Kansas City.

O’Keefe, who reviewed the findings, believes there may simply be “too much wear and tear” on the bodies of high-mileage runners. He has researched the issue and is an advocate of moderate running for the best health benefits. Chronic extreme exercise, O’Keefe said, may induce a “remodeling” of the heart, and that could undermine some of the benefits that moderate activity provides.

In O’Keefe’s view, the “sweet spot” for jogging for health benefits is a slow to moderate pace, about two or three times per week, for a total of one to 2.5 hours.

“If you want to run a marathon,” he said, “run one and cross it off your bucket list.” But as a general rule, O’Keefe advises runners to avoid strenuous exercise for more than an hour at a time.

More information

To learn more about this field of research, head to the Masters Running Study.