Archives For Exercise


Get Fit With Fido at Boston Area Parks

 


1. Ninety-nine percent of the ocean’s plastic is missing

On the hunt. The RV Hesperides tows along a net designed to skim the ocean surface, catching floating plastic particles (inset).

On the hunt. The RV Hesperides tows along a net designed to skim the ocean surface, catching floating plastic particles (inset).

2. China’s Dirty Pollution Secret: The Boom Poisoned Its Soil and Crops

China environmental problems

3. Lead Exposure May Cause Depression And Anxiety In Children

A child plays in a Beijing park. Health threats caused by pollution have become a major concern in China.

4. Study: BPA Can Activate Breast Cancer Cells

Unlike other breast cancers, inflammatory breast cancer may not cause a lump in the breast. Instead, it may cause the breast to be swollen, red, and warm.

5. New York Towns Can Prohibit Fracking, State’s Top Court Rules

6. Fracking study finds new gas wells leak more

 FILE - This July 27, 2011 file photo shows a farmhouse in the background framed by pipes connecting pumps where the hydraulic fracturing process in the Marcellus Shale layer to release natural gas was underway at a Range Resources site in Claysville, Pa. In Pennsylvania’s fracking boom, new and more unconventional wells leaked far more than older and traditional wells, according to a study of inspections of more than 41,000 wells drilled. And that means that that methane leaks could be a problem for drilling across the nation, said the author of the study, which funded in part by environmental activist groups and criticized by the energy industry. The study was published Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File).

7. Exercising when air pollution levels are high can do more harm than good

Exercising when air pollution levels are high can end up doing more harm than good, writes Rachel Jacqueline

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8. Michigan’s arsenic problem is among the worst in the nation. Here’s why that matters.

9. The race to stop Las Vegas from running dry

Amid a brutal drought the reservoir that supplies 90 per cent of Las Vegas’s water is fast disappearing

and desperate attempts to save Sin City are under way

Lake Mead: boaters seen in front of a white

10. Drakes Bay oyster farm denied Supreme Court hearing

A worker hauls traps at Drakes Bay Oyster Co. in Inverness. The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear an appeal of a federal order that would close the oyster farm, but the owners say they will continue their fight. Photo: Sam Wolson, Special To The Chronicle


1. “T”errific or “T”errible? A Review of Testosterone Deficiency

Charles P. Vega, MD

Slide 1.

2. Too Much Sitting After 60 May Lead to Disability

For each extra sedentary hour per day, researchers found a 50 percent increased risk

3. 4 Killer AB Exercises

4. Flu hit working-age adults hardest this year

 People with underlying illness, especially obesity, diabetes and lung problems, were at highest risk.

5. Groups call for safe reduction of C-sections

A new report outlines ways to safely reduce C-section rates.

C-section photo


1) 10 Ways to Boost Your Exercise Motivation

2) Slideshow: 25 Super Snacks With 100 Calories or Less

Ice cream snack

3) How to Claim Some ‘Me Time’

4) Essential Screening Tests for Women

Doctor Examining Woman With Stethoscope

5) 7 Muscle Foods for Men

6) Slideshow: 18 Secrets for a Longer Life

Illustration of dna and chromosones


By Diane MapesTODAY contributor

Fitness fads come and go. And sometimes, they inexplicably come galloping back again (we’re talking to you, Prancercise). Some exercise trends could use a little nudge toward the door, though, like family members who stay too long after the holidays. Herewith, a handful of hot fitness fads that have overstayed their welcome for one reason or another. Maybe they’ve caused too many injuries. Maybe they’re just too silly to deal with anymore. Whatever the reason, we’d love to say goodbye to these wacky fitness fads in 2014.

http://youtu.be/hAVf1C8_Gj4

You know what happens next, right?

Pole dancing. Yes, it takes skill, balance and coordination to spin around a pole upside down. And sure, it’s probably a heck of a workout. But aside from the fact that you’re expected to perform this “sport” in your underwear, pole dancing is risky (in some cases, devastatingly so). Pole dance forums regularly allude to bumps, bruises, cracked ribs and broken toes, says Dr. Ryan Stanton, a Lexington, Ky., emergency room doctors. That’s just the start, says Stanton, who’s also seen back, ankle and wrist injuries. “The majority of injuries are associated with falls,” he says. “And there’s also a risk of skin infections like strep and staph if the pole hasn’t been adequately sterilized.” Eww.

Yoga mash-ups. “Yoga’s not good enough on its own any more,” says Stanton, a spokesperson for the American College of Emergency Physicians or ACEP. “Now you have to turn up the temperature or do it on a paddleboard.” Or do it naked while suspended from the ceiling in a white “anti-gravity” bundle. Aside from being just plain silly, some of these yoga mash-ups can be risky. Stanton says he’s treated people who’ve passed out in hot yoga classes and warns that the practice can be dangerous for people with heart disease. Stand-up paddleboard or SUP yoga also carries a risk — of ending up in a video like this.

Gas mask training is like “being strangled while you exercise.” This is a fitness goal?

Gas mask training. It’s not just for firefighters and members of the military anymore. Now, regular old gym rats are getting their Darth Vader on by donning specialized — or Army-Navy surplus — gas masks in order to train for high altitude runs/climbs or restrict their oxygen intake for a much tougher workout. While proponents rave about the results (they also readily admit to “seeing stars”), Stanton compares the practice to “being strangled while you’re exercising.” Are you sure you want to run on a treadmill with that thing on, people?

Look out behind you!

BackwardsrunningAlso known as reverse running, retro running or “gninnur” (Yes, that’s “running” spelled backwards), backwards running may have gotten its start as a rehab exercise for athletes with pulled hamstrings. Today, though, it’s a trend, with races, a world champion and even an attempt to make it an Olympic sport. “That one’s really crazy,” says Jason Karp, an exercise physiologist from San Diego. “Humans are not meant to walk backward. It’s not how we’re designed. My major concern is that you’d trip and fall.” Not to mention strain your neck from looking behind you every three seconds.

Stiletto workouts. Fans of this “fitness” fad say working out in sky-high heels can strengthen your core, improve your balance and give you toned, taut legs. But Neal Pire, an exercise physiologist and fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, call this fitness craze  dubbed the “the world’s worst workout” by Prevention Magazine — unnatural. “When you wear high heels, you’re shortening your Achilles tendon, throwing off your center of gravity and putting stress on your lower back. And then there’s what happens in your feet.” ER doc Stanton is more blunt: “Anything in stilettos is an ankle injury waiting to happen,” he says.

Competitors swim through mud underneath electrified wires during the Tough Mudder at Mt. Snow in West Dover, Vermont July 15, 2012. The Tough Mudder i...

JESSICA RINALDI / Reuters
Competitors swim through mud underneath electrified wires during a Tough Mudder race. Live wires and water — good combo.

MOB races. “Mud, obstacle and beer” endurance challenges like the Tough Mudder and Warrior Dash have inspired many a couch potato to get off their duff — at least for the weekend. But it doesn’t come without a cost. A study by the ACEP found that a single competition last June resulted in 38 ER visits for everything from chest pain to dislocated shoulders to head and face injuries to electrical burns to paralysis. Even worse, there have been a handful of deaths. “This is a really high risk activity,” says Stanton. “People train for marathons but Tough Mudders attract people who have no intention of training — they just want to get out and run in the mud. It’s risky enough for the person in good shape, much less someone who hasn’t run 3 miles in the last year.”

Face plant! Exercise ball falls

Stability ball stands. Balance or stability balls have been a fixture at gyms for years. But lately, more and more people aren’t just using them for crunches or stretching, but for hot dog moves like standing atop a ball while doing bicep curls or shoulder presses. Can you say recipe for disaster? “I’ve seen contusions to the sacrum and lower back,” says Stanton. “I’ve seen people hit weight machines, hit benches, hit other people.” Stanton calls the tendency to push the fitness envelope “testosterone syndrome” or the “jock effect.” “People get to a gym and try to do more than they’re capable of,” he says. “But gravity always wins the day.”


1) Cut 1,000 calories from Thanksgiving

Cut 1,000 calories from Thanksgiving

2) 10 tips for healthy holidays

3) Share: How do you stay active over Thanksgiving?

4) The easiest way to cut calories and hunger on Thanksgiving


Steve & Becky Holman

See how they do it: http://oldschoolnewbody.com/5steps/index-m.php


Both of my daughters work out before they start their work day. My only son goes to the gym every day at the same time. It’s ritualistic for all of them. Obviously, it’s a good thing of all of them. Some schools are having students do short aerobic workouts along side their desk fora period of 5-10 minutes to help them think better. What works for you?

See how exercising at work helps others

http://m.mprnews.org/122794/show/aed71e68004a1464d1254f6a328fde2b/?

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3 More Flat-Ab Moves for the End of Summer

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http://news.health.com/2013/09/02/3-more-flat-ab-moves-for-the-end-of-summer/

Nervous? How to Ditch Pre-Event Performance Jitters

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http://news.health.com/2013/08/29/nervous-how-to-ditch-pre-event-performance-jitters/