Archives For Environmental Issues


1.  In West Virginia, whitewater rafting and the long tail of a chemical spill

Rafting outfitters believe a nearby chemical leak tainted business, even if it never

reached the waters here.

2. Study says early DDT exposure may set up females for obesity, diabetes

DDT pesticide obesity diabetes

3. Dam removals: Rivers on the run

As the United States destroys its old dams, species are streaming back into the

unfettered rivers.

4. Century-old pipe break points to national problem

The site of a water main break is shown near UCLA Wednesday July 30, 2014, in Los Angeles. A ruptured 93-year-old water main on Tuesday left the UCLA campus awash in 8 million gallons of water in the middle of California's worst drought in decades, stranding people in parking garages and flooding the school's storied basketball court less than two years after a major renovation. Photo: Nick Ut, AP / AP

5. In Lake of the Woods, growing algae blooms puzzle scientists

6. Environmentalists criticize mercury recycling bill

7. CLIMATE: EPA plan gives no credit for Southern states’ strides, utility

regulators say in Atlanta

Carbon-rule protestors

8. Religious Conservatives Embrace Pollution Fight

9. New rules to cut miners’ coal-dust exposure start Friday

coal miner

10. Delta tunnel plan called a fish death sentence by key group

Walter Suazo Jr., 9, of Concord shows off a 32-inch striped bass he caught from the Antioch pier on the San Joaquin River. A critique of the state's $25 billion plan for delta tunnels says they would bring winter-run salmon to the brink of extinction. Photo: Michael Macor, The Chronicle


1. Maine parents, physicians press for disclosure of phthalates use in products

Dozens pack a hearing to urge the DEP to make companies report the presence

of four types of the potentially harmful chemical.

AUGUSTA, ME - JULY 29: People listen to testimony Tuesday July 29, 2014 at hearing at the Department of Environmental Protection in Augusta on a citizen initiated proposal to list priority chemicals. (Photo by Andy Molloy/Staff Photographer)

2. Govt fails to vet chemical plants with terror risk

3. Leaping out of the lakes: Invasive mussels spread across America

Officials at Lake Powell fought for a decade to keep out quagga mussels. They lost the fight.

Lake Powell is one of the West’s most beautiful reservoirs. National Park Service employees fought for years to keep quagga mussels out of the man-made lake on the Colorado River.

4. Report: World faces water crises by 2040

Wind, solar power increase needed to avoid global drought

5. The reindeer herders battling an iron ore mine in Sweden

Reindeer in northern Sweden

6. Greener film shoots can also save costs, report says

'Noah'

7. Forensics for the Farm Keep Food Safe

8. ‘Indiscriminate’ use of antibiotics in poultry might be ‘strongly linked’ to growing

resistance in Indians: Study

'Indiscriminate' use of antibiotics in poultry might be 'strongly linked' to growing resistance in Indians: Study
CSE said that India has no regulation on controlling antibiotic use in the poultry
industry or to control sales of antibiotics to the industry while it has not set any
limits for antibiotic residues in chicken.

9. U.S. GMO crop companies double down on anti-labeling efforts

10. Senate Dems’ bill would bring back Superfund tax


1. Songbirds dying from DDT in Michigan yards; Superfund site blamed

2. Tour de France sees protest over toxic waste nobody wants

3. Born Too Soon

Can pollution lead to premature births?

4. Report on mercury poisoning never shared, Grassy Narrows leaders say

5. Formidable invasive species won’t be easy to keep out of Great Lakes

Zebra mussels, quagga mussels got here in ships’ ballast tanks. Can we stop the next invasion?

Spectators watch from a viewing tower as the Pilica pulls into the Welland Canal in Ontario in 2005.

6. Groups Press New York State to Ban Poisons That Kill Wildlife

7. De Blasio Deal Could Give Bike Sharing in New York a New Imprint

8. Welcome to Williston, North Dakota: America’s new gold rush city

Williston, North Dakota.

9. Manure-burning power plant in limbo

State eyeing $34.8 million subsidy to spur Shore facility fueled by poultry litter

10. Mining caused Antarctica lead pollution, scientists reveal

Mining caused Antarctica lead pollution, scientists reveal


1. The Safety Agency At War With Itself

Personnel disputes are tearing the Chemical Safety Board apart, leaving the

panel’s work unfinished—and workers at risk.

2. DOT proposes stricter oil train safety rules

Anthony Foxx is pictured. | M.Scott Mahaskey/POLITICO

3. Feds to conduct more studies of MCHM

4. Revealed: the dirty secret of the UK’s poultry industry

5. Why is Canada’s bee population in rapid decline?

Honey bees cluster on a bee keeping suit in Ravenna on October 18, 2013. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail)

6. Food Safety in China Still Faces Big Hurdles

7. The ‘breakthrough’ sixth-grade science project at the center of a fight over scientific glory

8. If It’s Raining, NYC’s Raw Sewage Is Probably Pouring Into the Waterways

Gowanus Canal

9. REFILE-Panel’s report likely to tie farm antibiotics to human resistance

10. Victorian diseases have come back to haunt us

Official figures show a rise in disease such as gout, cholera, whooping cough and malnutrition

Experts said some of the diseases – such as scarlet fever – are cyclical viruses, which are expected to rise and fall.


1, The U.S. Military is Scrutinized Over Trash Burning in Afghanistan

2. Washington Mudslide Report Sites Rain, but Doesn’t Give Cause or Assign Blame

3. An Exaltation of Moths, Much-Maligned Kin of the Butterfly

A single moth landed on a white cloth on Monday, along with many L.B.T.s, or little brown things.

4. Would You Like Flame Retardants With That Couch?

FURNITURE STORE COUCH

5. The rivers that run through it: A basin of toxins.

Parts of the Canard River near Front Road are pictured, June 23, 2014, near River Canard in Amherstburg.  (RICK DAWES/The Windsor Star)


1. Drug-resistant bacteria: Sewage-treatment plants described as giant

‘mixing vessels’ after scientists discover mutated microbes in British river

Exclusive: Discovery reveals role of sewerage plants in creating mutated
microbes that are resistant to antibiotics

3. NYC billionaire to spend money in Pennsylvania gubernatorial campaign

Billionaire Tom Steyer and his Super PAC, NextGen Climate, are making big

moves in Pennsylvania this year.

4. It’s 2025. Maternity Wards are empty.

5. 100 homes destroyed in Washington wildfire

Wildfires Prompt States Of Emergency

Scores of wildfires across the drought-stricken Western states have prompted

the governors of Washington and Oregon to declare states of emergency.

  6. The Pope and the Sin of Environmental Degradation

7. How to boost food production but not emissions? Researchers identify key ways.

8. Report says Kitimat, B.C., airshed can accommodate oil, gas, smelter industries

Report says Kitimat, B.C., airshed can accommodate oil, gas, smelter industries

9. EPA proposes strict limits on Pebble mine to protect salmon

10. The remarkable comeback of sea otters to the B.C. coast

A pair of sea otters eat a salmon near dawn at Esquimalt, B.C., on Vancouver Island, in this 2010 photo. They caught the fish in nearby waters and devoured it on a small dock. (ANDY CLARK/REUTERS)

11. Detroit water shut-offs spark war of words

Nine arrested in Detroit water shut-offs protest

12. Sulphur surplus: Up to our necks in a diabolical element

Sulphur fumes emanating from a crater in an active volcano on Java, Indonesia

13. California Halts Injection of Fracking Waste, Warning it May Be Contaminating Aquifers

State’s drought has forced farmers to rely on groundwater, even as California aquifers have

been intentionally polluted due to exemptions for oil industry.

The potential impact of waste from oil and gas drilling — including hydraulic
fracturing — on drinking water has been an issue in Texas, Wyoming and,
with great urgency, in California this month. Here, a jar of fracking water waste
is displayed at a recycling site in Midland, Texas. (Pat Sullivan/AP Photo)

14. Flattened mountains, poisoned rivers: China’s engineers face off against engineer-created problems

15. Proposed MCHM leak settlement could fund health studies, water testing 


1. One man’s home is another man’s uranium dump

Even for those who don't understand the concept of radiation, Robinson Lake is clearly not safe to drink from. (Madelene Cronjé, M&G)

2. Coal Fuels Brewpubs in Wyoming as Kentucky Mines Misery

3. EPA proposes limits on Alaska’s Pebble Mine project

Commercial fishing boats in Bristol Bay near Naknek. July 6, 2007 (flickr / echoforsberg)

4. In Dayton, Ohio an economic comeback is in the water

What if water was worth the price of gold? One Midwest city is betting on it.

In Dayton, Ohio, an economic comeback is in the water

5. Thousands Of Containers Fall Off Ships Every Year. What Happens To Them?

SHIPPING CONTAINER STUDY MBARI

6. Scientists unlock the genetic secrets of bread wheat

7. Climate Confidential

Illuminating the crossroads of environment and technology

8. Better use of world’s existing cropland could feed 3 billion more people: study

Research reveals large increases in population expected in the next three decades
need not result in widespread hunger
Food crisis and population  : farmer carries wheat crop bundles in Egypt

9. Governments agree to stem cancer-causing arsenic in rice: U.N.

10. ‘Empty and lonely’ Fukushima towns struggle in catastrophe’s wake

Atsushi Fuda

11. Report warns of diesel fumes’ risks

12. Chikungunya fever finally makes it to the United States – two cases in South Florida

13. A call to fight malaria one mosquito at a time by altering DNA.

14. Genetic Engineering to the Rescue Against Invasive Species?

Scientists call for a public discussion on development of emerging “gene drive” technology.

A photo of a female Asian Tiger Mosquito feeding on human blood.

15. Bald eagles expand territory in California islands

Channel Island Eagles


1. ‘All Men Are Created Equal': The Founding Fathers Didn’t Mean It

2. Friday Funny: Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? The NDN Version

Thinkstock

3. Wondo Talks World Cup, Native Heritage With Student Reporter

Brandon Frye
Fans wanting to take a selfie with Kiowa star Chris “Wondo” Wondolowski have
become a fact of life for the World Cup soccer athlete.

4. Blackhawk Down: Is this Logo Offensive?

ThoroldBlackhawks.com
The logo of the Thorold Blackhawks a junior hockey league in Ontario, Canada.
The logo is receiving scrutiny by its community members.

5. Quechan Business Leader Honored for Tenacity and Perseverance

6. George Preston Marshall’s Grandaughter Calls for Redskins to Change Name

7. Passamaquoddy Tribe Teams Up to Document Alewives’ Return in St. Croix River

International St. Croix River Watershed Board
Alewives are returning to the St. Croix River, which runs along part of the border
between Maine and New Brunswick, Canada.

8. Cleaves on Maine Commission Report: Committed to Discussion on Sharing

9. Stingless Wasps Recruited in Fight Against Emerald Ash Borer

Entomologists hope the emerald ash borer, above, can be kept in check by stingless wasps.

10. Photo: A Navajo Tapestry Featuring Angry Birds and 57,000 LEGO Bricks

11. Iroquois Nationals Pride! Pictures From the 2014 FIL World Lacrosse Championships

12. EPA Climate Justice Blog: Clean Power, Cleaner Communities

Environmental Protection Agency
Sources of greenhouse gases in the U.S.

13. Shifting the Focus: Four Components of Native Strength

Photo by Anthony ‘Thosh’ Collins, thoshography.com

14. Commerce Law Could Be Key to Establishing Tribal Economic Development Council

Thinkstock.com

15. The Hot List, Part I: 5 Native Actors You’ve Got to Watch


1. Offensive Words Lead to Offensive Actions

2. 10 Ways to Tell You Might Be a Rezballer!

3. ‘Racism Is Central’ to Tribal Conflict with Maine, Says Report

Wikimedia Commons
Deer Island is a Canadian island at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay.

4. Traditional Art and Culture Event Teaches Much More Than Painting

5. Get on the Bus: Sun Tours Explain Native Culture in Glacier Park

Jack McNeel
Sun Tours operates nine bus tours within Glacier National Park all with the goal of
explaining Blackfeet history in their ancestral homeland. The tour is only operated
about 4 months a year because snow prevents crossing Logan Pass, but views are
spectacular of glaciers, waterfalls, and wild flowers

6. Miles Thompson Leads Iroquois Nationals to World Lax Semifinals

Kenny Frost

7. Malaysia Airlines Jet Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine, 295 Dead

YouTube
A screen capture from a YouTube video that is believed to have been taken after the
Malaysia Airlines plane went down.

8. World Lacrosse Championships Player Profile: Warren Hill

Courtesy Kenny Frost
Warren Hill

9. Canoe Journey Message: Protect Our Fragile Environment

Tracy Rector/Longhouse Media
The Heiltsuk First Nation is hosting 31 canoes from Pacific Northwest indigenous
nations. That number was provided by the manager of the Paddle to Bella Bella
Facebook page. Canoes arrived July 13; the week of cultural celebration continues
through July 19.

10. Canadian Government Provides Funding to Support Ojibwe Language-Learning

11. Obsessed Much? 4 Videos by Tito Ybarra About Shoni (and Sherry) Schimmel

‘I’m the real star,’ says Sherry Schimmel. ‘I taught Shoni and Jude everything.’

12. Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience Announces Tribal

Climate Resilience Program

Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon
President Barack Obama attends the final meeting of the State, Local, and Tribal
Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience on July 16, 2014.

13. Shawn Michael Perry, Singing His Heart’s Song Louder Than Ever

Source: facebook.com/shawnmichael.perry
Shawn Michael Perry at the Ute Mountain Music Festival in 2012.

14. Controversial Grand Canyon Gondola Grounded for a Year

Grand Canyon Timelapse: The Living Landscape
The Grand Canyon Escalade project is slated at the confluence of the Little
Colorado and Colorado rivers in northern Arizona.

15. Video: President Barack Obama Ties Infrastructure to Climate Change Resilience

The White House/YouTube
President Barack Obama is flanked by members of the Task Force on Climate
Preparedness and Resilience. At the task force’s final meeting he emphasized
the importance of strengthening infrastructure as a way to stay economically
viable in the face of climate change.

1. Coral reefs face heightened risk of fatal disease from dredging, says research

Study finds sediment exposure can double risk of disease, raising questions over

Abbot Point expansion impact on Great Barrier Reef

White syndrome coral

2. Is organic food healthier? Many scientists are still skeptical

3. Intersex fish indicate chemical problems in Pa. rivers

Vicki Blazer, a fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, studied Pennsylvania´s rivers. She said estrogenic chemicals in the water "are likely complex mixtures" from agricultural and human sources.

4. What chemicals are lurking in your loaf? Nearly two thirds of bread products

found to contain pesticide residues

The study found that the percentage of bread products containing pesticide residues has more than doubled over the last 12 years - rising from 28 per cent in 2001 to 63 per cent in 2013

5. Australia Becomes First Developed Nation to Repeal Carbon Tax

Tony Abbott Pledged to Get Rid of the Tax Last Year

6. Scientists Look for Causes of Baffling Die-Off of Sea Stars

7. The curious case of the massive crater that just appeared at ‘the end of the Earth’

8. In North Dakota’s oil bonanza, natural gas goes up in flames

North Dakota gas flare

9. Top 5 Environmental Issues in America