Archives For Books


Parents will now have to approve every work of fiction

Gilford parents debate book s sexual content


1. NASA News Conference Highlights SpaceX 3 Science and Technology Cargo

2. Tech Junkie The world’s most popular technology news service Top App of The Week Review #2

3. Tech Junkie: The iPhone 5

4. Why Aren’t Teens Reading Like They Use To?

A student buries herself in a book in the Shaw Library at the British Library of Political and Economic Science in 1964.

5. Say It With A Selfie: Protesting In The Age Of Social Media

screen-shot-2014-05-09-at-5.54.00-pm_sq-b64dabfba82cc3e7108d507a5c2eb3158916717a

6. Steve Jobs calls up Dr. Dre about iTunes

7. Apps That Predict What You Want

8. Meet The Man Who Invented The Browser Tab

Adam Stiles recalls “the first tab” and how he came to create the atomic unit of internet navigation.

 


1. On New Native Leadership

2.  Resistance As Promised, Panamanian Indigenous Continue to Protest

Protesters from the Ngobe-Bugle tribe block a road during a protest in El Vigui, Panama, Thursday, February 2, 2012. Members of the Indian tribe blocked roads in two provinces on the border with Costa Rica in a dispute over mineral exploitation on their lands.

3. Mo’ Momoa! Sundance TV Renews ‘Red Road’ for Second Season

sundance.tv
Marie (Tamara Tunie) and Phillip Kopus (Jason Momoa) in ‘The Red Road’ Episode 6, ‘Snaring of the Sun.’

4. Tribe Breaks Ground on $80M Cherokee Casino Roland to Replace Existing Facility

Courtesy Cherokee Nation Entertainment
Cherokee Nation and Roland officials celebrate the groundbreaking of a new Cherokee Casino Roland, which will feature a 6-story, resort-style hotel.

5. Reparations Comment Sparks Ire After Bill for Indian Tuition Dies

Associated Press
Colorado State Senator Mary Hodge voted against House Bill 1124

6. Oneida Indian Nation Praises the NBA’s Decision to Ban Donald Sterling

Associated Press
Fans protest Sterling’s ownership interest in the Clippers before Game 5 of the Clippers/Warriors NBA playoff game at the Staples Center in Los Angeles

7. Videos: Man on the Street: Keystone XL Pipeline Protest in DC

8. Back to 350, Part 2: Confronting Climate Change in Indian Country

Thinkstock
Two tribal environmental experts weigh in on what it will take to get back to 350 parts per million of carbon dioxide, down from the current, dangerous 400 ppm.

9.  Chief Red Wing Day Symbolically Replaces Columbus Day in Minnesota

Wikimedia Commons
Chief Red Wing Day will symbolically replace Columbus Day in Red Wing, Minnesota.

10 New Yorker Chronicles the Demise of the Mega-Load Through Nez Perce Land

via The New Yorker
One of many mega-loads whose shipment has been attempted through Indian country, destined for the oil sands of Alberta, Canada.

11. Really? Wayne Coyne Supported Fallin With Picture of Dog in Headdress

Source: Instagram, via thelostogle.com
Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips shared a picture of friends and a dog doing ‘our best Christina Fallin’ pose.

12.  Cherokee Prof. Gets $2.9M Grant to Research an Intertribal Talking Circle for Drug Abuse Prevention

nursing.fau.edu
The goal of Dr. Lowe’s study is to evaluate the use of the Talking Circle to increase Native American youth cultural identity while decreasing their substance use.

13. Sterling’s Comments, Snyder’s Condescension: Two Sides of Same Coin

Michael Woestehoff
A graphic created by Michael Woestehoff that was widely circulated online; see below for full version.

14. Botched Oklahoma Execution Is a Test of Your Government Trust

15. Recipes: (kid-friendly) Navajo Fry Bread

16. Recipes: (kid-friendly) Breakfast Fried Rice

17. Best Native American Books for Children and Young Adults

18. Native American Clothing


By Wicked Local/Malden

Michael Richards (left) recently donated $1,500 to a local charity, as payment for a long-overdue library book. Also in the photo are Housing Families Community Outreach Coordinator Patty Kelly, Malden Public Library Director Dora St. Martin, Mayor Gary Christenson COURTESY PHOTO

WickedLocal/Malden

Malden, Mass. — Editor’s Note: The following is a release from the office of Mayor Gary Christenson:

WickedLocal/Malden reported recently stopped by Mayor Gary Christenson’s office to return a book that he borrowed from City Hall back in 1982 when he was a sixth-grader at the old Beebe Junior High.

His assignment was to write a report on the history of Malden. He stopped by City Hall and asked a staff member if there was a book he could borrow and was handed “Malden from Primitive Past to Progressive Present” with the agreement that he would return it when he finished his report.

A 1988 graduate of Malden High School, Michael moved out of Malden in 1996 but his mother recently found the book and remembered the deal he had made with the gentleman at City Hall.

“I called the Library and learned that the late fee is 10 cents daily with a maximum of $5,” said Michael. “Without the cap, the daily charge for 31 years adds up to $1,131.50 – I decided to round it up to $1,500 and make a donation to Housing Families.”

Additionally, Michael informed the mayor that Commonwealth Mortgage recently received MassHousing approval, which enables Commonwealth Mortgage to offer affordable, fixed-rate, home loan products for low and moderate-income homebuyers. The loans have low down payment options and competitive interest rates.

“I thank Michael Richards for remembering people in his hometown of Malden and giving back to families at risk,” said Housing Families Community Outreach Coordinator Patty Kelly. “These funds will help support programs which enable us to move forward with our mission of ending family homelessness. We are most appreciative of his generosity.”

“This is great news all around,” said Mayor Christenson. “We have our book back, Housing Families received a generous donation and Commonwealth Mortgage is better able to help residents buy homes in Malden. I also thank Michael for his continued support of our City.”

For more information about Commonwealth Mortgage visit: http://www.commonwealthmorgage.com or call Michael Richards at 781-404-2507. For more information about Housing Families visit http://www.housingfamilies.org.


By George Barnes, Telegram & Gazette

T&G STAFF/CHRISTINE PETERSON

GRAFTON, Mass. — Dianne Benson Davis had already helped raise polar bears and hunted with a red-tailed hawk, but living at the Quabbin Reservoir with eight baby bald eagles brought her about as close to nature as anyone could hope for.

“Eagle One: Raising Bald Eagles — a Wildlife Memoir” tells of a life spent caring for wildlife and educating people about the birds and mammals that are part of the world they live in. Published by Chandler House Press, the book draws on journals kept and letters Davis sent home to her parents, to tell the story of her life-changing summer of 1985 working with the highly successful Massachusetts Eagle Restoration Project. It includes sections of the journals and many photographs of the project, as well as other projects Davis has been involved in during her career.

Living in a tent trailer at the Quabbin Reservoir for four months in an area off-limits to most humans, Davis cared for eight eagle chicks that had been transplanted from Nova Scotia, in the hope they would make Massachusetts their home.

The eagle project, which lasted from 1982 to 1988, would result in the first successful Massachusetts nesting of bald eagles since 1906. Because of the success of the project, the number of nesting pairs in Massachusetts has gone from the first two in 1989 to 35 in 2012.

Davis said the inspiration she found working there and with others who made the miracle happen carried on in her later work at Tufts Veterinary Hospital, the EcoTarium and as natural history guide for the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

“I always hope to inspire a passion for science and nature,” she said. “You never know where you are going to pick up something that is going to stick with you for the rest of your life.”

For Davis, the moment was a visit by a Massachusetts Audubon Society volunteer to her elementary school classroom. By the time she was in high school, she was a volunteer at the EcoTarium in Worcester. After high school she became a zoo keeper for the EcoTarium, working with two polar bear cubs born there. Her work with the polar bears and other wildlife at the EcoTarium led to her becoming a wildlife rehabilitator and falconer. For 20 years she worked with a red-tailed hawk, training and hunting with it.

In 1982 Jack Swedberg, who had been observing and photographing wintering bald eagles at the Quabbin Reservoir for a decade, was given approval to begin a program aimed at the restoration of nesting eagle populations in the state. Davis was involved with the early planning of the project but turned down a job in 1982 because she was pregnant. In 1984 she was offered another job working with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service efforts to hatch the first peregrine falcons in downtown Boston. She again turned the job down because she had a young daughter at home.

It was in a visit to the Eagle Project later in 1984 that she received a third offer to work with raptor restoration efforts. This time she took the job, replacing UMass graduate student Dave Nelson, who cared for eagles the previous three years. The birds lived in a 40-foot-tall tower on the shore of the reservoir with cages for eight eagles.

During the four months at the Quabbin Reservoir, Davis said she fished every day to feed the eagles, which received 20 pounds of fish twice a day, along with vitamins. She caught the fish with gill nets, cut the fish up into bite-size pieces and fed the birds through chutes into their cages to avoid human contact. The plan was to raise healthy birds while giving them the chance to imprint on their surroundings. The hope, which proved successful, was that the birds would return to the reservoir to nest.

“It was exciting to write just about the daily ins and outs of working with the eagles and going out on the lake catching all their food,” she said.

Davis also got a chance to observe the first nesting loons in the state, including their daily activities in her journals, as well as living in an area that at the time had 60 deer per square mile.

The reservoir area has dramatically changed in the past 28 years. The deer herd has been dramatically reduced through hunting, resulting in greater diversity of plant species. Also, bear and moose — rarely if ever seen at the reservoir in 1985 — now regularly roam the woods, and eagles are regularly seen not only at the reservoir but throughout the state.

The book chronicles a life dedicated to nature, but pulls no punches. While working with the eagles, Davis went through a divorce. She later married Bill Davis, the central district supervisor for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, who worked with her on the eagle project and took over as the head of the project when Jack Swedberg retired.

Today the couple lives quietly in their home in Grafton with mementoes of their time with the eagles, including a large aerial photograph of the Quabbin Reservoir over their mantle, and a collection of eagle artifacts, including feathers, a stick from an eagle nest and a claw from an eagle that died at the Tufts Veterinary Medicine Clinic after being injured in an accident.

“Eagle One” can be purchased online at http://www.amazon.com, http://www.barnesandnoble.com, chandlerhousebooks.com, at the EcoTarium in Worcester and through the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

Davis will hold a talk and book signing from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Feb. 21 at Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary in Princeton, and at the Millers River Environmental Center in Athol on March 12.


95 errors in Rockwell biography, family claims

AP Photo/Sotheby’s

BOSTON —Relatives of the late Norman Rockwell claim a new biography of the famed American illustrator contains numerous inaccuracies and poses “phantom theories” about his sexual tendencies.

“American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell,” by Deborah Solomon, was published in November.

In a statement released by the Norman Rockwell Family Agency, relatives said they found at least 96 factual errors in the book.

Messages left for Solomon through her publisher were not immediately returned.

The family highlighted one reference in the book in which the author describes Rockwell going to schools at recess, and stopping boys on the street.

The family disputes the author’s suggestions that he was lonely or chronically depressed.

Rockwell illustrated more than 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post. He died in 1978.

He lived in Stockbridge.

 


Rare ‘Bay Psalm Book‘ published by the Puritans in 1640

Oldest book of Psalms

New York (CNN) —The world’s most valuable book sold Tuesday for $14.16 million at Sotheby’s in New York, according to the auction house.

Published in 1640, the rare Bay Psalm Book is the first book ever written and printed in what is now the United States. Its sale set a record for a book sold at auction, Sotheby’s said.

Philanthropist David Rubenstein purchased one of 11 surviving copies.

He “plans to share it with the American public by loaning it to libraries across the country, before putting it on long-term loan at one of them,” according to Sotheby’s.

The Bay Psalm Book is a translation of the biblical psalms by the Puritans and was an important part of their church service.

“It’s so very valuable because it is the beginning of Western civilization in our country,” said David Redden, vice chairman of Sotheby’s. “In fact, it is the first poetry in America — it’s as simple as that.”

Currently, the 11 surviving versions of the 1,700 originally printed are in institutional collections, including Harvard, Yale, Oxford, the New York Public Library and the Huntington Library in California.

The book auctioned Tuesday is from the collection of the Old South Church in Boston, Massachusetts, which had it for more than 300 years. It is one of two copies in their possession, with the sale intended to support its mission and ministry in Boston.

Congregationalist Puritans, who settled around Massachusetts Bay in search of religious freedom, wanted to translate and produce a version of the Book of Psalms closer to the Hebrew original than the one they had brought over from England.

The first edition of the Bay Psalm Book was printed in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Tuesday’s sale is the first time since 1947 and the second time since 1894 that a copy has appeared at auction. In 1947, it achieved a higher price than any other book printed at the time, when Sotheby’s sold it for $151,000.

“This little book of 1640 was a precursor to Lexington and Concord, and, ultimately, to American political independence,” Redden said. “With it, New England declared its independence from the Church of England.”

Tuesday’s sale eclipses the previous auction record for a printed book, at Sotheby’s London, when a copy of John James Audubon‘s Birds of America sold for $11.5 million in 2010, the auction house said.

 

Good Reads

11/09/2013 — Leave a comment

I’m currently enjoying the book “Science and Civic Life in the Italian Renaissance by Eugenio Garin, Translated by Peter Munz

  

What are your feelings on the Italian Renaissance?


20131024-122123.jpg
Banned or challenged books through the ages | Home – Local News http://www.wcvb.com/banned-or-challenged-books/-/9849586/22467786/-/fr6la7/-/index.html#.UmlImyOH_V4.twitter


1) These Are the Most Exquisitely Weird Spiders You Will Ever See

Long Horned

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/07/weirdest-spiders-ever/

2) The World’s Most Amazing Trees

The World's Most Amazing Trees Rainbow Eucalyptus

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/the-worlds-most-amazing-trees

3) The 20 Most Beautiful Bookstores in the World

http://flavorwire.com/254434/the-20-most-beautiful-bookstores-in-the-world/