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Taken from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream”,

Act II, Scene II

Fai, Over hill, over dale,

Thorough bush, thorough brier,

Over par, over pale,

Thorough flood, thorough fire,

I do wander everywhere,

Swifter than the moon’s sphere;

And I serve the fairy queen,

To dew her orbs upon the green.

The cowslips her pensioners be:

In their gold coats spots you see;

Those be rubies, fairy favours,

In those freckles live their savours:

I must go seek some dew-drops here,

And hang a pearl in every cowslip’s ear.

Farewell, thou lob of spirits; I’ll be gone:

Our queen and all our eles come here soon.

 

 


Taken from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act IV, Scene III pg 38

 

Who s Silvia? what is she,

That all our swains commend her?

Holy, fair, and wise is she,

The heavens such grace did lend her,

That she might admired be.

 

Is she kind as she is fair?

For beauty lives with kindness:

Love doth to her eyes repair,

To help him of his blindness;

And, being help’d inhabits there.

 

Then to Silvia, let us sing.

That Silvia is excelling;

She excels each mortal thing

Upon the dull earth dwelling.

To her let us garlands bring.


Taken from the Complete Works of William Shakespeare

The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act  V, Scene V

Song.

Fye on sinful fantasy!

Fye on lust and luxury!

Lust is but a bloody fire,

Kindled with unchaste desire,

Fed in heart; whose flames aspire,

As thoughts do blow then, higher and higher,

Pinch him, fairies, mutually;

Pinch him for his villany;

Pinch him, and burn him, and turn him about,

Pinch him, and burn him, and turn him about,

Till candles, and star-light, and moonshine be out.


What is love? ’tis not hereafter;

Present mirth hath present laughter;

What’s to come is still unsure:

In delay there lies no plenty;

Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty,

Youth’s a stuff will not endure.

…William Shakespeare taken from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare


Temporary tattoo on Julia Louis-Dreyfus has document signed by wrong author

AP Photo/Rolling Stone, Mark Seliger

LOS ANGELES — Julia Louis-Dreyfus better hope her latest tattoo is a temporary one.

The cover image of next month’s Rolling Stone magazine featuring the “Veep” star depicts a nude Louis-Dreyfus with a tattoo of the U.S. Constitution signed by John Hancock across her back. The problem is Hancock signed the Declaration of Independence, not the Constitution.

Louis-Dreyfus jokingly blamed the blunder on Mike McClintock, the fictional “Veep” character played by Matt Walsh who serves as communications director to Louis-Dreyfus’ Vice President Selina Meyer on the HBO comedy series.

“Yet another Mike (expletive),” the 53-year-old actress posted Wednesday on Twitter. “Dummy.”

The National Constitution Center in Philadelphia mocked the flub by tweeting a photo of the cover alongside such Founding Fathers as George Washington and Benjamin Franklin in Signers’ Hall with the words, “Thanks for the shoutout but no Hancock here.”

Rolling Stone spokeswoman Melissa Bruno said the Declaration of the Independence is on the other side of Louis-Dreyfus’ body, but they couldn’t fit in the signatures.

Inside the magazine, another image shot by photographer Mark Seliger shows a man in a colonial wig tattooing Hancock’s signature above the bare bottom of the Seinfeld actress,

“I’m a perfectionist in my work,” Louis-Dreyfus notes in the magazine’s cover story. “I think I might drive people nuts. I don’t ask them, because I don’t need that (expletive) on top of how I’m feeling.”


By George Barnes, Telegram & Gazette

T&G STAFF/CHRISTINE PETERSON

GRAFTON, Mass. — Dianne Benson Davis had already helped raise polar bears and hunted with a red-tailed hawk, but living at the Quabbin Reservoir with eight baby bald eagles brought her about as close to nature as anyone could hope for.

“Eagle One: Raising Bald Eagles — a Wildlife Memoir” tells of a life spent caring for wildlife and educating people about the birds and mammals that are part of the world they live in. Published by Chandler House Press, the book draws on journals kept and letters Davis sent home to her parents, to tell the story of her life-changing summer of 1985 working with the highly successful Massachusetts Eagle Restoration Project. It includes sections of the journals and many photographs of the project, as well as other projects Davis has been involved in during her career.

Living in a tent trailer at the Quabbin Reservoir for four months in an area off-limits to most humans, Davis cared for eight eagle chicks that had been transplanted from Nova Scotia, in the hope they would make Massachusetts their home.

The eagle project, which lasted from 1982 to 1988, would result in the first successful Massachusetts nesting of bald eagles since 1906. Because of the success of the project, the number of nesting pairs in Massachusetts has gone from the first two in 1989 to 35 in 2012.

Davis said the inspiration she found working there and with others who made the miracle happen carried on in her later work at Tufts Veterinary Hospital, the EcoTarium and as natural history guide for the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

“I always hope to inspire a passion for science and nature,” she said. “You never know where you are going to pick up something that is going to stick with you for the rest of your life.”

For Davis, the moment was a visit by a Massachusetts Audubon Society volunteer to her elementary school classroom. By the time she was in high school, she was a volunteer at the EcoTarium in Worcester. After high school she became a zoo keeper for the EcoTarium, working with two polar bear cubs born there. Her work with the polar bears and other wildlife at the EcoTarium led to her becoming a wildlife rehabilitator and falconer. For 20 years she worked with a red-tailed hawk, training and hunting with it.

In 1982 Jack Swedberg, who had been observing and photographing wintering bald eagles at the Quabbin Reservoir for a decade, was given approval to begin a program aimed at the restoration of nesting eagle populations in the state. Davis was involved with the early planning of the project but turned down a job in 1982 because she was pregnant. In 1984 she was offered another job working with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service efforts to hatch the first peregrine falcons in downtown Boston. She again turned the job down because she had a young daughter at home.

It was in a visit to the Eagle Project later in 1984 that she received a third offer to work with raptor restoration efforts. This time she took the job, replacing UMass graduate student Dave Nelson, who cared for eagles the previous three years. The birds lived in a 40-foot-tall tower on the shore of the reservoir with cages for eight eagles.

During the four months at the Quabbin Reservoir, Davis said she fished every day to feed the eagles, which received 20 pounds of fish twice a day, along with vitamins. She caught the fish with gill nets, cut the fish up into bite-size pieces and fed the birds through chutes into their cages to avoid human contact. The plan was to raise healthy birds while giving them the chance to imprint on their surroundings. The hope, which proved successful, was that the birds would return to the reservoir to nest.

“It was exciting to write just about the daily ins and outs of working with the eagles and going out on the lake catching all their food,” she said.

Davis also got a chance to observe the first nesting loons in the state, including their daily activities in her journals, as well as living in an area that at the time had 60 deer per square mile.

The reservoir area has dramatically changed in the past 28 years. The deer herd has been dramatically reduced through hunting, resulting in greater diversity of plant species. Also, bear and moose — rarely if ever seen at the reservoir in 1985 — now regularly roam the woods, and eagles are regularly seen not only at the reservoir but throughout the state.

The book chronicles a life dedicated to nature, but pulls no punches. While working with the eagles, Davis went through a divorce. She later married Bill Davis, the central district supervisor for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, who worked with her on the eagle project and took over as the head of the project when Jack Swedberg retired.

Today the couple lives quietly in their home in Grafton with mementoes of their time with the eagles, including a large aerial photograph of the Quabbin Reservoir over their mantle, and a collection of eagle artifacts, including feathers, a stick from an eagle nest and a claw from an eagle that died at the Tufts Veterinary Medicine Clinic after being injured in an accident.

“Eagle One” can be purchased online at http://www.amazon.com, http://www.barnesandnoble.com, chandlerhousebooks.com, at the EcoTarium in Worcester and through the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

Davis will hold a talk and book signing from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Feb. 21 at Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary in Princeton, and at the Millers River Environmental Center in Athol on March 12.


95 errors in Rockwell biography, family claims

AP Photo/Sotheby’s

BOSTON —Relatives of the late Norman Rockwell claim a new biography of the famed American illustrator contains numerous inaccuracies and poses “phantom theories” about his sexual tendencies.

“American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell,” by Deborah Solomon, was published in November.

In a statement released by the Norman Rockwell Family Agency, relatives said they found at least 96 factual errors in the book.

Messages left for Solomon through her publisher were not immediately returned.

The family highlighted one reference in the book in which the author describes Rockwell going to schools at recess, and stopping boys on the street.

The family disputes the author’s suggestions that he was lonely or chronically depressed.

Rockwell illustrated more than 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post. He died in 1978.

He lived in Stockbridge.

 


Young-adult author who wrote of depression commits suicide

Ned Vizzini  SABRA EMBURY

NEW YORK - Ned Vizzini, a popular young adult author and television writer who wrote candidly and humorously about his struggles with depression, has committed suicide. He was 32.

Vizzini jumped off the roof of his parents’ home in Brooklyn on Thursday, said his brother, Daniel Vizzini. New York City’s medical examiner’s office confirmed Friday that Vizzini took his own life and had sustained blunt impact injuries consistent with a fall. Daniel Vizzini said his brother had battled mental illness for much of his life and had “taken a turn for the worse” in recent weeks.

Ned Vizzini’s autobiographical novel “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” was adapted into a feature film of the same name. A resident of Los Angeles in recent years, he was a prolific author of fiction and nonfiction and spoke around the country about mental health and the healing effects of writing. On his website, he recommended Andrew Solomon’s “The Noonday Demon” and the Dalai Lama’s “The Art of Happiness” to readers coping with depression.

“At his signings, countless kids would approach him to say that he changed their lives – he gave them hope,” his longtime publisher, Alessandra Balzer of Balzer + Bray, said in a statement Friday. Balzer + Bray is an imprint of HarperCollins.

John Green, Megan McCafferty and Sarah Dessen were among the authors mourning him on Twitter. In a telephone interview with The Associated Press, an emotional Judy Blume called him one of those people “who just touch your life in a certain way.”

“I met him when he was a kid at some sort of get together that (New York City Mayor Mike) Bloomberg was having,” she said. “And he was this incredibly lively young man and I told him, ‘I can’t wait to see what you do.’”

vizzini_two.jpg

FILE – In this May 17, 2006, file photo, author Ned Vizzini poses for a photo in New York’s Central Park
 JIM COOPER, AP

“It’s Kind of a Funny Story,” praised by The New York Times as “insightful and utterly authentic,” was written in just a few weeks and published in 2006. Set in New York City, and 85 percent true, according to Vizzini, it told of an ambitious, but overworked high school student who considers jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge and ends up in a psychiatric ward.

“So why am I depressed?” asks narrator Craig Gilner. “That’s the million-dollar question, baby, the Tootsie Roll question; not even the owl knows the answer to that one. I don’t know either. All I know is the chronology.”

A couple of years before the book came out, Blume introduced Vizzini for a segment on the “Today” show. She was worried by how “subdued” he was compared to when she first met him.

“And later, he wrote ‘It’s Kind of a Funny Story’ and when I read it, I knew that what had happened to the kid in the book happened to him,” Blume said.

The movie version was released in 2010 and starred Keir Gilchrist, Zach Galifianakis, Emma Roberts and Viola Davis.

Vizzini’s other books include “Be More Chill” and “The Other Normals,” both of which told of young people who feel like outsiders. This year, he and filmmaker Chris Columbus debuted a trilogy of young adult fantasy books, “House of Secrets.” The second installment had been completed and is scheduled for March. No decisions have been made about the third book, according to his publisher.

Vizzini also was working on the NBC series “Believe,” a project co-created by J.J. Abrams and Alfonso Cuaron. His other TV writing credits include “Teen Wolf” and “Last Resort.” A musical adaptation of “Be More Chill” has been in the works.

Vizzini grew up in Brooklyn and attended one of New York City’s most competitive high schools, Stuyvesant, the basis for the school in “It’s Kind of a Funny Story.” He had many influences – from Miles Davis to Stephen King – and his writing gift became obvious. As a teenager, an essay he wrote about adolescence was published in The New York Times.

“Although I’m still in the thick of my teenage years, I think I’ve learned a thing or two by now,” he wrote. “And as far as I can tell, being a teenager is just like being a kid, except that you’ve got five extra niggling concerns: sex, money, smoking, drinking and getting into college.”

He did advance, to Hunter College, and by age 19 his first book had been released, “Teen Angst? Naaah … A Quasi Autobiography.” Over the years, his work appeared in The New Yorker, Salon and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Asked once why he wanted to be a writer, he responded: “I knew that I wanted to be a writer because I wanted to do something that had the potential to outlast my own death.”

He is survived by his wife and one son.

Associated Press

Join the Brookline Public Library (Main Library, Hunneman Hall) for an evening with local author Gabe Galambos and a discussion of his new novel, The Nation by the River. Event begins at 7 pm. In his new mystery, Gabe Galambos transports readers to the town of Best Harbor, Massachusetts, whose secret society community of Crypto-Jews is, by appearances Catholic, by secret observances Jewish, and by legacies of secrecy and deceit—a people apart. For these “People of the Nação,” a still resonating historic calamity helps to ensure that it be that way.


In the 1850s, a fugitive slave penned a fictionalized autobiography that would somehow end up collecting dust in an attic in New Jersey. Nearly a century later, an African-American librarian bought it from a New York City bookseller for $85. In 2001, famed scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. bought the manuscript at auction for $8,500. The next year, the novel “The Bondwoman’s Narrative” was published and became a bestseller.

Though the book – believed to be the first written by an African-American woman – was signed by Hannah Crafts, the real identity of the author has remained an enigma. Now a professor in South Carolina says he has solved the mystery. http://cbsn.ws/17M6vKr

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