Archives For Alcohol


Even in moderation, alcohol may be hard on your heart

Bournon, whiskey


Parents whose kids aren’t fitting in with the “cool” crowd needn’t worry, study authors say.

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EMS says drinking, drugs to blame

Dozens sent to hospital after TD Garden concert


1. Cancer valley pays a high price for South Africa’s oil needs

Respiratory illnesses are taking their toll on South Durban residents, but petrochemical firms deny culpability and won’t cough up for health costs.

There are about 300 smokestacks in the South Durban area. (Delwyn Verasamy, M&G)

2. Ahead of the EPA

Is Colorado proof that the EPA’s new standards can work — or that they’re worthless?

3. Sea Star Disease Growing on Oregon Coast

AP Photo

4. Sierra rises, quakes erupt as Central Valley aquifer drained

5. Slowing flow: Anheuser-Busch trying to brew with less water

Anheuser-Busch's Houston plant produces 12 million barrels of beer a year. Its conservation efforts are saving a lot of water, company officials say.

6. Breaking Bad: A Nuclear Waste Disaster

7.  Why is Glasgow the UK’s sickest city?

 

Glasgow panorama


1. The Truth About Bug Spray

Not all insect repellents are created equal. Here’s how to avoid getting eaten alive.

2. Back pain: the spiralling effects of a problem no one can see

3. Are saturated fats as bad as we have been led to believe?

4. Soldiers surprisingly resilient to PTSD after Iraq and Afghanistan

5. Just one binge drinking session may harm health

glass of red wine

6. Minnesota tops in senior health, study says

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7. Mental health system needs overhaul: Your Say

Your Say 0518 XXX cost-of-not-caring-441

8. Red wine and chocolate for better health? Maybe not

chocolate, chocolate ba, dark chocolate

9. Vitamin E-rich oils linked to lung inflammation

Canola oil

10Cheaper Food May Be Fueling U.S. Obesity Epidemic

Americans spend just one-tenth of disposable income on food, an historic low, study finds

HealthDay news image


Police warn there may be more victims

Raymond Black

Raymond Black

DERRY, N.H. — A man in Derry has been arrested and accused of sexually assaulting two middle-school girls, and police said they believe there may be more victims.

Derry police said Raymond Black, 60, is accused of drugging the girls, supplying them with alcohol and paying them for sexual acts.

“He’s accused of sexually assaulting the juveniles, perpetrating assaults against them and having them do things to him,” said Capt. Vern Thomas.

Police said the assaults happened over the summer. The girls are 12 and 13 years old and live in Black’s neighborhood, police said.

“I don’t think we can say they did anything willingly,” Thomas said. “They are not of age of consent to do something like that anyway, and he’s being held accountable.”

After a lengthy investigation, police issued an arrest warrant, and Black turned himself in Thursday. He’s facing eight charges related to sexual assault.

“I would hope that if there are parents out there who know their children were around this individual, they would contact us,” Thomas said.

News 9 talked with several of Black’s neighbors. None wanted to go on camera but did say they heard rumors there had been illegal activity going on for sometime.

Black is being held on $25,000 cash bail at the Rockingham County Jail. He is scheduled to be arraigned next week.


Kim Kyung-hoon / Reuters, file

Retired U.S. basketball star Dennis Rodman

By Becky Bratu, Staff Writer, NBC News

Retired basketball star Dennis Rodman checked into an alcohol rehabilitation center to seek treatment for his long-time struggle with alcoholism, his agent said.

Dennis Prince declined to disclose which facility will treat the star.

“What was potentially a historic and monumental event turned into a nightmare for everyone concerned,” Prince said, according to The Associated Press. “Dennis Rodman came back from North Korea in pretty rough shape emotionally. The pressure that was put on him to be a combination ‘super human’ political figure and ‘fixer’ got the better of him.

“He is embarrassed, saddened and remorseful for the anger and hurt his words have caused.”

Rodman, 52, recently returned to the United States from yet another trip to North Korea, where he led an auditorium crowd in serenading the reclusive nation’s leader, Kim Jong Un, with “Happy Birthday” at an exhibition game between former NBA players and a North Korean team.

A day earlier, in a bizarre, expletive-littered and sometimes incoherent interview with CNN, Rodman came close to suggesting that an American held captive in North Korea for more than a year, Kenneth Bae, was responsible for his captivity.

Bae’s family was outraged, and Rodman was also slammed for not using his influence with Kim to help free the American.

Rodman ultimately apologized for his comments regarding Bae, saying he had been drinking and was upset because some of his teammates were leaving under pressure.

Rodman, known as much for his antics, tattoos and adventurous fashion choices as he was for basketball, won five NBA championships with the Detroit Pistons and Chicago Bulls.

The star was the highest-profile American to meet the North Korean leader since he inherited power from father Kim Jong Il in 2011. Rodman traveled to Pyongyang for the first time last February.

In November, the hoops star debuted “Dennis Rodman — The original Bad Ass Premium Vodka,” a “six times distilled all-American premium vodka.”

The endorsement was an unconventional choice for a star who has had issues with alcohol in the past, including getting arrested for driving drunk and assaulting his ex-fiancee. Rodman also entered an outpatient rehab facility in 2008. A year later, he agreed to appear on the third season of the show “Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew,” but he didn’t stay out of trouble.

In 2012, the Los Angeles Times detailed Rodman’s transgressions and legal issues and said the NBA Hall of Famer was broke and unable to get work.

“In all honesty, Dennis, although a very sweet person, is an alcoholic,” Peggy Williams, his then financial adviser, was quoted as saying. “His sickness impacts his ability to get work.”


Police: Speed, alcohol may have been factors

SEABROOK, N.H. —A man and a woman were killed when a car hit a parked car and a utility pole Saturday morning in Seabrook, N.H. police said.

Colon Ross, 23, of Hampton Falls and Stacy Walsh, 22, of West Newbury, Mass., died after a 2002 Honda Accord crashed on Causeway Street. The crash was reported at 4:39 a.m.

Ross was heading northbound when he lost control of the car. Walsh was a passenger in the front seat. Both were pronounced dead at the scene.

Unreasonable speed and alcohol appeared to be factors, police said.


Men who drink more than 2.5 drinks a day speed loss by 6 years, study says

BOSTON —A new British study finds middle-aged men who drink more than two-and-a-half alcoholic beverages a day may speed their memory loss by as many as six years.

Dr. James leverenz did not take part in the study but treats dementia at cleveland clinic and is the director at the lou ruvo center for brain health.

“This is what we call an association study. So, they see these associations, it’s not clear if these are cause and effect or just an association related to some other aspect that is common in these heavier drinking men,” said Dr. James Leverenz, of the Cleveland Clinic.

Researchers at University College London studied more than 5,000 men and nearly 2,100 women. Their average age was 56.

They found no differences in memory and executive function among men who did not drink, or drank less than two alcoholic beverages per day.

But heavy drinking men showed declines between one-and-a-half to six years faster than the light drinkers.

They did not find similar results in women; in fact, they found women who drank less saw more cognitive decline during the same period of time.

Researchers say previous research on the relationship between drinking and memory loss was done on older populations, not middle-aged people, so more studies are needed.

Levernez says the findings, if nothing else, remind us all to drink in moderation.

“I think it does argue that, perhaps, we should all be careful as we drink,” he said.

Complete findings for the study are available in the online issue of “Neurology.”


Whiskey, bourbon

To find out which cities drink the most during the year, The Daily Beast analyzed the average number of drinks per month per adult and a city’s percentages of heavy and binge drinkers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here are the 25 drunkest cities in America: Click here

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