Archives For Abuse


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Regret – When the shoe is on the other foot©

When you met everything was pure
Through the years much changed and anger and resentment built up
She wanting things from you that you didn’t have to give
She was angry and unforgiving
Her anger came out in violence
She left you battered and bruised
As a man you didn’t want to hurt her, but her abuse was worsening
She tried to kill you
You had no choice you struck out to defend yourself
Now she had the upper hand
She was no longer the abuser
You now were
You found a way to leave her and move on without her
You were determined to find love and happiness again
You reconnect with a past love but don’t tell her of your past
Somehow she connects with your ex and the new-found happiness you found has ended
Now you live with regret of not telling her
For now she thinks you’re an animal
Inside you feel it’s true
Now you’re begging for forgiveness and hoping for a new-found love
You look to friends for absolution
They recommend that you move on
But remind you that honesty is the best policy
For no one likes liars or surprises
He pledges to be true full you can only hope for and wish him happiness
Reminding him that he has to first forgive himself to move on
You hear a silence noting his awareness of all new now has to do
So ever though finding happiness would be so hard to do
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I wrote this poem in response to a story a friend told me of his romantic woes. I advised him to let his new love go. The trust was gone and the feeling of safety was absent. There could be no successful relationship there as it all started with a lie. I advised him that in the future he would always have to be honest or he would never find happiness. I so hope he will give it a try.

 


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Today my heart cracked a little©

By Felina Silver Robinson

Copyright© 2014

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I read the story of a mother from Mercer County, PA

Cracked my heart a little

I cried me a river when I heard

that

Mary Rader is a mother of four

Doing her job was too much of a chore

With her own mother and her mother’s husband living at her home

There’s was almost one child for each adult

Who could ask for more

But in her eyes it wasn’t good enough

So I don’t know her rhyme or her reason

But she chose her 7-year-old son Antonio

To be sent to his own private dungeon

He slept in the basement

with the cold cement floor for his bed and his bathroom

No company, no food, no hot water

Sometimes allowed upstairs for the sake of a cold shower

Maybe a small fraction of food

An occasional trip to the backyard

Not remembering how to play he catches bugs like a snake

for that he is beaten

He tries to sneak real food but is beaten again

So it’s time to return to the basement

Where silence has become his best friend

Each day that passes his pounds slip away

His little teeth begin to rot and his feet have become infected

What his case worker sees when he is finally found

is a poor little 7-year-old skeleton near his death

The adults tending to the house

Show no remorse of course

The caseworker is puzzled

When she finds three healthy siblings running about the house

With no rhyme or reason poor Antonio lay wasting away

in a tomb darkened by boarded windows

What wrong could a poor little boy do

Covered in urine and feces atop his dirt riddled body

Near death she said

An undeserving mother now facing charges

Antonio and siblings with a better future ahead

Now Mary Rader must face the music

There is no penance that can save her

A full sentence must be served

May god heal her children with happiness and cheer

May they find peace through the love of good people

This is the only thing that can heal the crack in my heart



Tasers and Young Children. This issue is something I find truly disturbing. Yesterday I read an article and posted the link on my blog in my Native American Corner posting for the day. The article entitled: SD Police Say Tazing 8-Year-Old Native Girl Was Justified, Family Sues speaks to how it took four police officers to control an 8-year-old girl who was no more than 4 feet tall, 71-pound girl. Some paint a wild, disrespectful, uncontrollable picture of this girl. Other speak to how sweet she can be. The reality is as said by the young girls grandmother, 8-year-old children will most often do whatever you tell them to do. If they are doing wrong, it’s not that hard to get them to change their mind and do the right thing.

I have a set of twins that are 14-years-old. One of them stands at 5’3 and just finally made it up to 97-pounds. She is a toothpick. I’m certain if 4 police officers were tossing her around that would snap her in two. I can’t even begin to picture the interaction that the four police officers had with the 8-year-old back in October of 2013.  She had a small paring knife, but the article doesn’t say that she was trying to hurt anyone with it. Regardless, if there were four police officers, there is no way that between them, they couldn’t have maneuvered their way around her eliminating the need to use a stun gun on her.

I would be concerned about causing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This child must have been scared out of her mind having a gun of any kind pointed at her at such a young age. I can see no reasonable explanation for such an act.

Its my feeling that strict guidelines should be made and required for the use of stun guns.  There should be weight and age requirements. No child under the age of 17 or 120 lbs should have a Taser used on them.  If a child has any disability then a stun gun should not be used at all.

Please explain this situation to me someone, anyone.  It’s outrageously insane.

Felina Silver Robinson


Zelda Williams wrote she was stepping away from social media ‘for a good long time’


State agencies accused of neglecting children in facilities


Domestic helpers rally outside Wanchai District Court in Hong Kong on Sept. 18 in support of an Indonesian maid who was tortured by her employers.

 

Reuters

The case of a young Indonesian maid hospitalized after allegedly being tortured by her employers has sparked outrage in Hong Kong, the latest in a series of cases that have spotlighted the abuse such workers often face.

According to a local migrant workers union, an Indonesian domestic helper in her 20s, Erwiana Sulistyaningsih, arrived in Hong Kong in May and worked for eight months before leaving on Jan. 10 to return to Indonesia, where she is currently being hospitalized. During her employment, she was beaten and periodically burned to the point that she struggled to walk and use the bathroom on her own, said Sringatin, vice chair of the Indonesian Migrant Workers Union. Sringatin, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, added that the maid was being compelled to use diapers as a result.

Photos of an injured woman who the union identified as Ms. Sulistyaningsih showed a person with legs and arms that were badly lacerated and scabbed.

“They would always say she’s lazy, cannot work, cannot perform,” said Ms. Sringatin. It was unclear who had paid for Ms. Sulistyaningsih’s ticket or under what circumstances she left Hong Kong. Ms. Sringatin didn’t disclose the name of Ms. Sulistyaningsih’s employers.

The Hong Kong police said Tuesday that they are currently investigating a Sunday report from a domestic helper employment agency that an Indonesian maid may have been tortured by her employer, without identifying the woman by name.

Attempts to reach Ms. Sulistyaningsih were unsuccessful. The Indonesian consulate in Hong Kong said it has identified and plans to blacklist Ms. Sulistyaningsih’s employer, thereby barring that individual from hiring any Indonesian domestic helpers in the future, said Sam Aryadi, consulate spokesman. As of 2013, there were 155 employers in Hong Kong whom the consulate has blacklisted for mistreating their helpers, which includes offenses such as underpaying and physically abusing them, he said.

Hong Kong is home to some 150,000 Indonesian maids, largely female, who together account for roughly half of the city’s 300,000 domestic helpers. Most of the rest are from the Philippines.

In a recent report by Amnesty International titled “Exploited for profit, failed by government,” the group blasted the city for failing to adequately protect such women, declaring that employers “frequently subject  migrant domestic workers to serious human rights violations in Hong Kong,” including physical and sexual violence.

According to the report, three-quarters of the women they interviewed had their identity documents confiscated by their employers or placement agency, with many told that they would be returned only after their placement fees—which can cost as much as US$2,700 or more—were repaid.

A staff member at Ms. Sulistyaningsih’s employment agency, Chan’s Asia Recruitment Centre, said that they had heard from Ms. Sulistyaningsih only once after she arrived in Hong Kong, a month into her new position, when she called and said that her employers were too demanding and didn’t pay her on time. She didn’t complain of physical abuse and never called again, said the staff member.

On Tuesday, Ms. Sringatin said that Ms. Sulistyaningsih’s case showed how the requirement that maids live with their employers made them more vulnerable to abuse by denying them of any safe space of their own. “There were no witnesses to what was going on for her,” she said.

Hong Kong has seen several well-publicized abuse cases over the years, including one last year in which an Indonesian maid was scalded with an iron by her employers, whipped and periodically kept bound in a chair. Her employers, who denied the charges, were sentenced to prison last September. In another case, an employer was jailed for beating her Indonesian maid to the point that she also required hospitalization.

Note: This post has been updated to include comment from the Indonesian consulate.

– Te-Ping Chen and Chester Yung